A retrospective study of risk factors for repeated admissions for asthma in a rural/suburban university hospital.

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Abstract

In the study reported, the authors examined risk factors for repeated hospital admissions for asthma in a rural/suburban setting. Charts of patients who were hospitalized two or more times with the diagnosis of asthma between June 1991 and January 1998 were reviewed. A questionnaire was completed for each admission for 65 patients. The results demonstrated an equal male-to-female ratio, with a mean age of 27 years. Hispanics represented 12% of the patients although they accounted for only 2.5% of the general population in the area under study. The mean number of hospital admissions was 3.2. A history of depression existed in 25% of the patients. Noncompliance was admitted in 38%. Twenty-five percent were active tobacco smokers. Acknowledged triggers of asthma included viral infections (74%), exercise (50%), weather conditions (43%), dust (38%), cats (36%), sinusitis (32%), pollen (32%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (31%), dogs (30%), smoke (28%), and emotional stress (15%). Medications at time of admission included albuterol (98%), salmeterol xinafoate (26%), theophylline (38%), ipratropium bromide (55%), nedocromil sodium (20%), cromolyn sodium (35%), prednisone (49%), and inhaled corticosteroids (69%). Ninety-five percent had access to a primary care physician. Fifty-seven percent had a pulmonary and 11% had an allergy consult. These data suggest that patients in rural/suburban areas with repeated hospitalizations for asthma have a high probability of noncompliance, depression, and allergenic triggers. Gastroesophageal reflux was a common recognized trigger. Inhaled steroids were underused, whereas ipratropium and theophylline were overused. Bilingual education on asthma and triggers and social support are necessary even in rural healthcare settings without a large minority population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
Volume101
Issue number5 Suppl
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Asthma
Retrospective Studies
Ipratropium
Theophylline
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Nedocromil
Depression
Cromolyn Sodium
Albuterol
Patient Admission
Sinusitis
Weather
Primary Care Physicians
Virus Diseases
Prednisone
Pollen
Dust
Psychological Stress
Hispanic Americans
Smoke

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

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title = "A retrospective study of risk factors for repeated admissions for asthma in a rural/suburban university hospital.",
abstract = "In the study reported, the authors examined risk factors for repeated hospital admissions for asthma in a rural/suburban setting. Charts of patients who were hospitalized two or more times with the diagnosis of asthma between June 1991 and January 1998 were reviewed. A questionnaire was completed for each admission for 65 patients. The results demonstrated an equal male-to-female ratio, with a mean age of 27 years. Hispanics represented 12{\%} of the patients although they accounted for only 2.5{\%} of the general population in the area under study. The mean number of hospital admissions was 3.2. A history of depression existed in 25{\%} of the patients. Noncompliance was admitted in 38{\%}. Twenty-five percent were active tobacco smokers. Acknowledged triggers of asthma included viral infections (74{\%}), exercise (50{\%}), weather conditions (43{\%}), dust (38{\%}), cats (36{\%}), sinusitis (32{\%}), pollen (32{\%}), gastroesophageal reflux disease (31{\%}), dogs (30{\%}), smoke (28{\%}), and emotional stress (15{\%}). Medications at time of admission included albuterol (98{\%}), salmeterol xinafoate (26{\%}), theophylline (38{\%}), ipratropium bromide (55{\%}), nedocromil sodium (20{\%}), cromolyn sodium (35{\%}), prednisone (49{\%}), and inhaled corticosteroids (69{\%}). Ninety-five percent had access to a primary care physician. Fifty-seven percent had a pulmonary and 11{\%} had an allergy consult. These data suggest that patients in rural/suburban areas with repeated hospitalizations for asthma have a high probability of noncompliance, depression, and allergenic triggers. Gastroesophageal reflux was a common recognized trigger. Inhaled steroids were underused, whereas ipratropium and theophylline were overused. Bilingual education on asthma and triggers and social support are necessary even in rural healthcare settings without a large minority population.",
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