A Selective, Protein-Based Fluorescent Sensor with Picomolar Affinity for Rare Earth Elements

Joseph A. Mattocks, Jackson V. Ho, Joseph Alfred Cotruvo, Jr.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sensitive yet rapid methods for detection of rare earth elements (REEs), including lanthanides (Lns), would facilitate mining and recycling of these elements. Here we report a highly selective, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor for Lns, LaMP1, based on the recently characterized protein, lanmodulin. LaMP1 displays a 7-fold ratiometric response to all Ln III s, with apparent K d s of 10-50 pM but only weak response to other common divalent and trivalent metal ions. We use LaMP1 to demonstrate for the first time that a Ln-utilizing bacterium, Methylobacterium extorquens, selectively transports early Lns (La III -Nd III ) into its cytosol, a surprising observation as the only Ln-proteins identified to date are periplasmic. Finally, we apply LaMP1 to suggest the existence of a Ln III uptake system utilizing a secreted metal chelator, akin to siderophore-mediated Fe III acquisition. LaMP1 not only sheds light on Ln biology but also may be a useful technology for detecting and quantifying REEs in environmental and industrial samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Lanthanoid Series Elements
Rare earth elements
Proteins
Methylobacterium extorquens
Sensors
Metals
Siderophores
Recycling
Chelating Agents
Cytosol
Metal ions
Bacteria
Observation
Ions
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Catalysis
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

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abstract = "Sensitive yet rapid methods for detection of rare earth elements (REEs), including lanthanides (Lns), would facilitate mining and recycling of these elements. Here we report a highly selective, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor for Lns, LaMP1, based on the recently characterized protein, lanmodulin. LaMP1 displays a 7-fold ratiometric response to all Ln III s, with apparent K d s of 10-50 pM but only weak response to other common divalent and trivalent metal ions. We use LaMP1 to demonstrate for the first time that a Ln-utilizing bacterium, Methylobacterium extorquens, selectively transports early Lns (La III -Nd III ) into its cytosol, a surprising observation as the only Ln-proteins identified to date are periplasmic. Finally, we apply LaMP1 to suggest the existence of a Ln III uptake system utilizing a secreted metal chelator, akin to siderophore-mediated Fe III acquisition. LaMP1 not only sheds light on Ln biology but also may be a useful technology for detecting and quantifying REEs in environmental and industrial samples.",
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A Selective, Protein-Based Fluorescent Sensor with Picomolar Affinity for Rare Earth Elements. / Mattocks, Joseph A.; Ho, Jackson V.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph Alfred.

In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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