A Shelterwood-Burn Technique for Regenerating Productive Upland Oak Sites in the Piedmont Region

Patrick Hugh Brose, David H. Van Lear, Patrick D. Keyser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regenerating oak stands unproductive upland sites is widely recognized by foresters as a major problem in hardwood management. Recent research indicates thatoak regeneration is more resistant to surface fires than its primary competitors on these sites if burning occurs 3 to 5 yr after a partial overstory harvest. This combination of cutting followed by fire (shelterwood-burn technique) mimics natural disturbances that have occurred in eastern North America for millennia and appears to be a viable approach to regenerating oaks on productive upland sites. This paper presents silvicultural guidelines for applying the shelterwood-burn technique unproductive upland sites and discusses its benefits for private landowners and resource professionals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-163
Number of pages6
JournalSouthern Journal of Applied Forestry
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - Aug 1 1999

Fingerprint

shelterwood systems
piedmont
Quercus
highlands
overstory
landowner
regeneration
foresters
landowners
disturbance
hardwood
resource
methodology
oak
North America
cutting (process)
harvest

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Brose, Patrick Hugh ; Van Lear, David H. ; Keyser, Patrick D. / A Shelterwood-Burn Technique for Regenerating Productive Upland Oak Sites in the Piedmont Region. In: Southern Journal of Applied Forestry. 1999 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 158-163.
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A Shelterwood-Burn Technique for Regenerating Productive Upland Oak Sites in the Piedmont Region. / Brose, Patrick Hugh; Van Lear, David H.; Keyser, Patrick D.

In: Southern Journal of Applied Forestry, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.08.1999, p. 158-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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