A Shelterwood-Burn Technique for Regenerating Productive Upland Oak Sites in the Piedmont Region

Patrick H. Brose, David H. Van Lear, Patrick D. Keyser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Regenerating oak stands unproductive upland sites is widely recognized by foresters as a major problem in hardwood management. Recent research indicates thatoak regeneration is more resistant to surface fires than its primary competitors on these sites if burning occurs 3 to 5 yr after a partial overstory harvest. This combination of cutting followed by fire (shelterwood-burn technique) mimics natural disturbances that have occurred in eastern North America for millennia and appears to be a viable approach to regenerating oaks on productive upland sites. This paper presents silvicultural guidelines for applying the shelterwood-burn technique unproductive upland sites and discusses its benefits for private landowners and resource professionals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-163
Number of pages6
JournalSouthern Journal of Applied Forestry
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1999

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry
  • Plant Science

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