A simplified permeability model for coalbed methane reservoirs based on matchstick strain and constant volume theory

Qiang Ma, Satya Harpalani, Shimin Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

82 Scopus citations

Abstract

Significant changes occur in the absolute permeability of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs during primary depletion or enhanced recovery/CO2 sequestration operations. In order to project gas production, several analytical models have been developed to predict changes in coal permeability as a function of stress/porosity and sorption. Although these models are more transparent and less complicated than the coupled numerical models, there are differences between the various analytical models and there are several uncertainties. These are discussed briefly in this paper. A new model is then proposed, which is based on the volumetric balance between the bulk coal, and solid grains and pores, using the constant volume theory. It incorporates primarily the changes in grain and cleat volumes and is, therefore, different from the other models that lay heavy emphasis on the pore volume/cleat compressibility values. Finally, in order to demonstrate the simplicity of the proposed model, a history matching exercise is carried out using field data in order to compare the different models. The modeling results suggest that the agreement between the predicted permeability using the existing models and the one proposed here is very good. The merit of the proposed model is its simplicity, and the fact that all input parameters are easily measurable for any coal type with no uncertainties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-48
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Coal Geology
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fuel Technology
  • Geology
  • Economic Geology
  • Stratigraphy

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