A simultaneous evaluation of 10 commonly used physical activity questionnaires

David R. Jacobs, Barbara E. Ainsworth, Terryl Johnson Hartman, S. Leon Arthur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1259 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten commonly used physical activity questionnaires were evaluated for reliability and validity in 78 men and women aged 20-59, with varying physical activity habits. One month reliability was found to be high for all questionnaires except those pertaining only to the last week or month. Longer term test-retest reliability tended to be lower. Validity was studied in relation to treadmill exercise performance, vital capacity, body fatness, the average of 14 4-wk physical activity histories and the average of 14 2-d accelerometer readings. No questionnaire measure was correlated with the accelerometer reading, and correlations with vital capacity were generally low. Only the Minnesota Leisure Time Physical Activity Questionnaire household chores measure was correlated with habitual performance of household chores. Most questionnaires, even very simple ones, were related to performance of heavy intensity physical activity and treadmill performance; these same questionnaires tended to be related to percent body fat. Fewer questionnaires related to performance of light or moderate activity. Occupational activity was unrelated to any of the validation measures. It is concluded that there are multiple, nonoverlapping dimensions of physical activity, reflected in multiple nonoverlapping validation realms. More important than the length or attention to detail of a questionnaire seems to be the logic of its questions. Important areas of physical activity that should be addressed in future questionnaires include sleep, light, moderate and heavy intensity leisure activities, household chores, and occupational activity. Recent versus habitual activity should also be considered.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-91
Number of pages11
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

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Exercise
Leisure Activities
Vital Capacity
Reproducibility of Results
Reading
Surveys and Questionnaires
Light
Habits
Adipose Tissue
Sleep

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Jacobs, David R. ; Ainsworth, Barbara E. ; Hartman, Terryl Johnson ; Arthur, S. Leon. / A simultaneous evaluation of 10 commonly used physical activity questionnaires. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1993 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 81-91.
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A simultaneous evaluation of 10 commonly used physical activity questionnaires. / Jacobs, David R.; Ainsworth, Barbara E.; Hartman, Terryl Johnson; Arthur, S. Leon.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.01.1993, p. 81-91.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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