A six-year predictive test of adolescent family relationship quality and effortful control pathways to emerging adult social and emotional health

Gregory M. Fosco, Allison S. Caruthers, Thomas J. Dishion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

This longitudinal study examined how a multimethod (youth report, parent report, direct observation) assessment of family relationship quality (cohesion and conflict) in adolescence (age 16-17) predicted growth and maintenance of effortful control across ages 17, 22, and 23 years old, and, ultimately, subjective well-being, emotional distress, and aggressive behavior in emerging adulthood (23). A diverse sample of 792 youth at age 17 and their families, and youth at ages 22 and 23, were studied to examine family cohesion and conflict and the growth and maintenance of effortful control as predictors of emerging adult social and emotional health. Results indicated that family cohesion and conflict during late adolescence and mean-level effortful control at age 22 each served as unique pathways to emerging adult adjustment. These findings underscore the importance of family functioning during adolescence and the maintenance of effortful control into emerging adulthood for understanding adjustment during the emerging adulthood period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-575
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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