A strain based approach to calculate disparities in pore structure between shale basins during permeability evolution

B. Schwartz, K. Huffman, D. Thornton, Derek Elsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We test the permeability response of Marcellus shale and Wolfcamp shale under changing strain. While magnitude of strain for a given stress is determined predominantly through mineral composition, the response of transport properties to a given strain are dependent on pore density, pore geometry, and rock fabric/mineral distribution around pores. We characterize the differences between the two shales using bulk mineralogy, SEM imaging with elemental analysis, and the cubic law for permeability evolution. We find that the Marcellus shale is comprised predominantly of clays that leads to more deformation when stressed than the Wolfcamp shale which is composed predominantly of quartz and calcite. The level of creep and compaction are directly related to the amount of clay in each shale sample. A novel result of our study is a strain-driven model to capture permeability evolution in shale due to differences in pore structure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102893
JournalJournal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering
Volume68
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

Fingerprint

Shale
Pore structure
Clay
Minerals
Mineralogy
Calcite
Chemical analysis
Transport properties
Quartz
Creep
Compaction
Rocks
Imaging techniques
Scanning electron microscopy
Geometry

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology

Cite this

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title = "A strain based approach to calculate disparities in pore structure between shale basins during permeability evolution",
abstract = "We test the permeability response of Marcellus shale and Wolfcamp shale under changing strain. While magnitude of strain for a given stress is determined predominantly through mineral composition, the response of transport properties to a given strain are dependent on pore density, pore geometry, and rock fabric/mineral distribution around pores. We characterize the differences between the two shales using bulk mineralogy, SEM imaging with elemental analysis, and the cubic law for permeability evolution. We find that the Marcellus shale is comprised predominantly of clays that leads to more deformation when stressed than the Wolfcamp shale which is composed predominantly of quartz and calcite. The level of creep and compaction are directly related to the amount of clay in each shale sample. A novel result of our study is a strain-driven model to capture permeability evolution in shale due to differences in pore structure.",
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A strain based approach to calculate disparities in pore structure between shale basins during permeability evolution. / Schwartz, B.; Huffman, K.; Thornton, D.; Elsworth, Derek.

In: Journal of Natural Gas Science and Engineering, Vol. 68, 102893, 01.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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