A Stress Buffering Perspective on the Progression of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study used the stress buffering perspective to identify social resources, including social network support, having a high quality marriage, and spousal support, that protect against deleterious effects of the progression of Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) on quality of life. Participants included 130 married adults living with AATD. We measured participants’ quality of life in three ways: perceived stress, life satisfaction, and perceptions of social stigma. The results suggested that disease progression corresponded positively with perceived stress and negatively with life satisfaction. Social network support moderated the association between disease progression and perceived stress and social stigma, and spousal support moderated the association between disease progression and perceived stress and life satisfaction. Marital quality was not a significant moderator. The discussion highlights the stress buffering effects of social support from close others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Communication
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency
Social Stigma
Social Support
Disease Progression
Psychological Stress
Quality of Life
Moderators
Disease
Marriage
social network
quality of life
satisfaction with life
moderator
Autosomal Recessive alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency
social support
marriage
resources

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

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title = "A Stress Buffering Perspective on the Progression of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency",
abstract = "This study used the stress buffering perspective to identify social resources, including social network support, having a high quality marriage, and spousal support, that protect against deleterious effects of the progression of Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) on quality of life. Participants included 130 married adults living with AATD. We measured participants’ quality of life in three ways: perceived stress, life satisfaction, and perceptions of social stigma. The results suggested that disease progression corresponded positively with perceived stress and negatively with life satisfaction. Social network support moderated the association between disease progression and perceived stress and social stigma, and spousal support moderated the association between disease progression and perceived stress and life satisfaction. Marital quality was not a significant moderator. The discussion highlights the stress buffering effects of social support from close others.",
author = "Xi Tian and Solomon, {Denise Haunani} and Smith, {Rachel Annette}",
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