A swine model of soy protein-induced food allergenicity: Implications in human and swine nutrition

John Scott Radcliffe, Luiz F. Brito, Lavanya Reddivari, Monica Schmidt, Eliot M. Herman, Allan P. Schinckel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Implications • Basic digestive processes result in the breakdown of most foodborne antigens; however, a small proportion of food-derived antigens cross the intestinal barrier leading to a brief period of hypersensitivity that is usually followed by the development of oral tolerance. • A shift from oral tolerance to sensitization marks the potential for clinical allergy development. • The anatomical, physiological, histological, genomic homology, and immunological similarity between pigs and humans make pigs a better model than traditional rodent species to study food allergies and intervention strategies. • A subset of pigs naturally develop soy allergies making them an ideal model for soy allergies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)52-59
Number of pages8
JournalAnimal Frontiers
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Animals
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Radcliffe, J. S., Brito, L. F., Reddivari, L., Schmidt, M., Herman, E. M., & Schinckel, A. P. (2019). A swine model of soy protein-induced food allergenicity: Implications in human and swine nutrition. Animal Frontiers, 9(3), 52-59. https://doi.org/10.1093/af/vfz025