A Talent for Tinkering: Developing Talents in Children From Low-Income Households Through Engineering Curriculum

Ann Robinson, Jill L. Adelson, Kristy A. Kidd, Christine Cunningham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Guided by the theoretical framework of curriculum as a platform for talent development, this quasi-experimental field study investigated an intervention focused on engineering curriculum and curriculum based on a biography of a scientist through a comparative design implemented in low-income schools. Student outcome measures included science content achievement, engineering knowledge, and engineering engagement. The sample comprised 1,387 Grade 1 students across 62 classrooms. Multilevel modeling was used separately for each of the three student outcome measures. The intervention resulted in an effect size of 0.28 on an out-of-level science content assessment and effect size of 0.66 for the engineering knowledge measure. Students in the intervention group reported a high level of engineering engagement. General education teachers were trained to implement the curricula through a summer institute and received coaching throughout the subsequent academic year. Evidence suggests the intervention functioned as a talent-spotting tool as teachers reported they would nominate a substantial portion of low-income and culturally diverse students for subsequent gifted and talented services. Discussion focused on the match between the needs and preferences of students from low-income households for hands-on design experiences and the curricular affordances in the engineering domain as a talent development pathway for young, poor children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-144
Number of pages15
JournalGifted Child Quarterly
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Aptitude
Curriculum
low income
engineering
Students
curriculum
student
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Metrorrhagia
coaching
general education
teacher
science
knowledge
school grade
Education
classroom
school
evidence
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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A Talent for Tinkering : Developing Talents in Children From Low-Income Households Through Engineering Curriculum. / Robinson, Ann; Adelson, Jill L.; Kidd, Kristy A.; Cunningham, Christine.

In: Gifted Child Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 130-144.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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