A TATA binding protein regulatory network that governs transcription complex assembly

Kathryn L. Huisinga, Benjamin Franklin Pugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Eukaryotic genes are controlled by proteins that assemble stepwise into a transcription complex. How the individual biochemically defined assembly steps are coordinated and applied throughout a genome is largely unknown. Here, we model and experimentally test a portion of the assembly process involving the regulation of the TATA binding protein (TBP) throughout the yeast genome. Results: Biochemical knowledge was used to formulate a series of coupled TBP regulatory reactions involving TFIID, SAGA, NC2, Mot1, and promoter DNA. The reactions were then linked to basic segments of the transcription cycle and modeled computationally. A single framework was employed, allowing the contribution of specific steps to vary from gene to gene. Promoter binding and transcriptional output were measured genome-wide using ChIP-chip and expression microarray assays. Mutagenesis was used to test the framework by shutting down specific parts of the network. Conclusion: The model accounts for the regulation of TBP at most transcriptionally active promoters and provides a conceptual tool for interpreting genome-wide data sets. The findings further demonstrate the interconnections of TBP regulation on a genome-wide scale.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberR46
JournalGenome biology
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2 2007

Fingerprint

TATA-Box Binding Protein
binding proteins
genome
transcription (genetics)
Genome
protein
promoter regions
gene
Transcription Factor TFIID
genes
mutagenesis
Mutagenesis
Genes
yeast
Yeasts
testing
assay
yeasts
DNA
assays

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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A TATA binding protein regulatory network that governs transcription complex assembly. / Huisinga, Kathryn L.; Pugh, Benjamin Franklin.

In: Genome biology, Vol. 8, No. 4, R46, 02.04.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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