A test of the form-resistant correlation hypothesis: Ratings, rankings, and the measurement of values

Jon A. Krosnick, Duane F. Alwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

A number of researchers have argued that ranking techniques are more appropriate than rating methods for the measurement of values in surveys. The form-resistant correlation hypothesis proposes that observed associations among values and between values and other variables should remain invariant across measurement methods. However, some recent research on parental values for child qualities suggests that ratings and rankings produce different correlational results. The present study tests the hypothesis that discrepancies between rating and ranking results are due to the fact that, when responding to rating questions, some respondents avoid making difficult choices between valued qualities by rating all the qualities as highly and equally desirable. Consistent with this hypothesis, when nondifferentiating respondents are removed from the analyzed sample, the substantive results of analyses of rating data resemble the results typically obtained using ranking data. This suggests that ranking may be the superior method for measuring values.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)526-538
Number of pages13
JournalPublic Opinion Quarterly
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1988

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A test of the form-resistant correlation hypothesis: Ratings, rankings, and the measurement of values'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this