A unifying gravity framework for dispersal

Eelke Jongejans, Olav Skarpaas, Matthew J. Ferrari, Eric S. Long, Joseph T. Dauer, Carrie M. Schwarz, Emily S.J. Rauschert, Randa Jabbour, David A. Mortensen, Scott A. Isard, David A. Lieb, Zeynep Sezen, Andrew G. Hulting, Katriona Shea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most organisms disperse at some life-history stage, but different research traditions to study dispersal have evolved in botany, zoology, and epidemiology. In this paper, we synthesize concepts, principles, patterns, and processes in dispersal across organisms. We suggest a consistent conceptual framework for dispersal, which utilizes generalized gravity models. This framework will facilitate communication among research traditions, guide the development of dispersal models for theoretical and applied ecology, and enable common representation across taxonomic groups, encapsulating processes at the source and destination of movement, as well as during the intervening relocation process, while allowing each of these stages in the dispersal process to be addressed separately and in relevant detail. For different research traditions, certain parts of the dispersal process are less studied than others (e.g., seed release processes in plants and termination of dispersal in terrestrial and aquatic animals). The generalized gravity model can serve as a unifying framework for such processes, because it captures the general conceptual and formal components of any dispersal process, no matter what the relevant biological timescale involved. We illustrate the use of the framework with examples of passive (a plant), active (an animal), and vectored (a fungus) dispersal, and point out promising applications, including studies of dispersal mechanisms, total dispersal kernels, and spatial population dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-223
Number of pages17
JournalTheoretical Ecology
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2015

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gravity
zoology
study application
botany
epidemiology
relocation
conceptual framework
population dynamics
life history
fungus
communication
timescale
seed
animal

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology
  • Ecological Modeling

Cite this

Jongejans, E., Skarpaas, O., Ferrari, M. J., Long, E. S., Dauer, J. T., Schwarz, C. M., ... Shea, K. (2015). A unifying gravity framework for dispersal. Theoretical Ecology, 8(2), 207-223. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12080-014-0245-5
Jongejans, Eelke ; Skarpaas, Olav ; Ferrari, Matthew J. ; Long, Eric S. ; Dauer, Joseph T. ; Schwarz, Carrie M. ; Rauschert, Emily S.J. ; Jabbour, Randa ; Mortensen, David A. ; Isard, Scott A. ; Lieb, David A. ; Sezen, Zeynep ; Hulting, Andrew G. ; Shea, Katriona. / A unifying gravity framework for dispersal. In: Theoretical Ecology. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 207-223.
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Jongejans, E, Skarpaas, O, Ferrari, MJ, Long, ES, Dauer, JT, Schwarz, CM, Rauschert, ESJ, Jabbour, R, Mortensen, DA, Isard, SA, Lieb, DA, Sezen, Z, Hulting, AG & Shea, K 2015, 'A unifying gravity framework for dispersal', Theoretical Ecology, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 207-223. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12080-014-0245-5

A unifying gravity framework for dispersal. / Jongejans, Eelke; Skarpaas, Olav; Ferrari, Matthew J.; Long, Eric S.; Dauer, Joseph T.; Schwarz, Carrie M.; Rauschert, Emily S.J.; Jabbour, Randa; Mortensen, David A.; Isard, Scott A.; Lieb, David A.; Sezen, Zeynep; Hulting, Andrew G.; Shea, Katriona.

In: Theoretical Ecology, Vol. 8, No. 2, 13.12.2015, p. 207-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Jongejans, Eelke

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AU - Rauschert, Emily S.J.

AU - Jabbour, Randa

AU - Mortensen, David A.

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AU - Hulting, Andrew G.

AU - Shea, Katriona

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Jongejans E, Skarpaas O, Ferrari MJ, Long ES, Dauer JT, Schwarz CM et al. A unifying gravity framework for dispersal. Theoretical Ecology. 2015 Dec 13;8(2):207-223. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12080-014-0245-5