A water quality monitoring network design methodology for the selection of critical sampling points

Part II

R. O. Strobl, P. D. Robillard, Rick Lane Day, Robert David Shannon, A. J. McDonnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to resolve the spatial component of the design of a water quality monitoring network, a methodology has been developed to identify the critical sampling locations within a watershed. This methodology, called Critical Sampling Points (CSP), focuses on the contaminant total phosphorus (TP), and is applicable to small, predominantly agricultural-forested watersheds. The CSP methodology was translated into a model, called Water Quality Monitoring Station Analysis (WQMSA). It incorporates a geographic information system (GIS) for spatial analysis and data manipulation purposes, a hydrologic/water quality simulation model for estimating TP loads, and an artificial intelligence technology for improved input data representation. The model input data include a number of hydrologic, topographic, soils, vegetative, and land use factors. The model also includes an economic and logistics component. The validity of the CSP methodology was tested on a small experimental Pennsylvanian watershed, for which TP data from a number of single storm events were available for various sampling points within the watershed. A comparison of the ratios of observed to predicted TP loads between sampling points revealed that the model's results were promising.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-334
Number of pages16
JournalEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessment
Volume122
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Fingerprint

network design
Water quality
Sampling
Watersheds
water quality
Phosphorus
methodology
Monitoring
sampling
watershed
phosphorus
artificial intelligence
Pennsylvanian
spatial analysis
Land use
spatial data
Geographic information systems
Artificial intelligence
monitoring network
Logistics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Pollution
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Strobl, R. O. ; Robillard, P. D. ; Day, Rick Lane ; Shannon, Robert David ; McDonnell, A. J. / A water quality monitoring network design methodology for the selection of critical sampling points : Part II. In: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment. 2006 ; Vol. 122, No. 1-3. pp. 319-334.
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A water quality monitoring network design methodology for the selection of critical sampling points : Part II. / Strobl, R. O.; Robillard, P. D.; Day, Rick Lane; Shannon, Robert David; McDonnell, A. J.

In: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, Vol. 122, No. 1-3, 01.11.2006, p. 319-334.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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