A web-based patient activation intervention to improve hypertension care

Study design and baseline characteristics in the web hypertension study

Jeffrey Thiboutot, Heather Stuckey, Aja Binette, Donna Kephart, William Curry, Bonita Falkner, Christopher Sciamanna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite the known health risks of hypertension, many hypertensive patients still have uncontrolled blood pressure. Clinical inertia, the tendency of physicians not to intensify treatment, is a common barrier in controlling chronic diseases. This trial is aimed at determining the impact of activating patients to ask providers to make changes to their care through tailored feedback. Methods: Diagnosed hypertensive patients were enrolled in this RCT and randomized to one of two study groups: (1) the intervention condition - Web-based hypertension feedback, based on the individual patient's self-report of health variables and previous BP measurements, to prompt them to ask questions during their next physician's visit about hypertension care (2) the control condition - Web-based preventive health feedback, based on the individual's self-report of receiving preventive care (e.g., pap testing), to prompt them to ask questions during their next physician's visit about preventive care. The primary outcome of the study is change in blood pressure and change in the percentage of patients in each group with controlled blood pressure. Conclusion: Five hundred participants were enrolled and baseline characteristics include a mean age of 60.0. years; 57.6% female; and 77.6% white. Overall 37.7% participants had uncontrolled blood pressure; the mean body mass index (BMI) was in the obese range (32.4) and 21.8% had diabetes. By activating patients to become involved in their own care, we believe the addition of the web-based intervention will improve blood pressure control compared to a control group who receive web-based preventive messages unrelated to hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)634-646
Number of pages13
JournalContemporary Clinical Trials
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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Patient Participation
Hypertension
Blood Pressure
Preventive Medicine
Physicians
Self Report
Health
Body Mass Index
Chronic Disease
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Control Groups

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "A web-based patient activation intervention to improve hypertension care: Study design and baseline characteristics in the web hypertension study",
abstract = "Background: Despite the known health risks of hypertension, many hypertensive patients still have uncontrolled blood pressure. Clinical inertia, the tendency of physicians not to intensify treatment, is a common barrier in controlling chronic diseases. This trial is aimed at determining the impact of activating patients to ask providers to make changes to their care through tailored feedback. Methods: Diagnosed hypertensive patients were enrolled in this RCT and randomized to one of two study groups: (1) the intervention condition - Web-based hypertension feedback, based on the individual patient's self-report of health variables and previous BP measurements, to prompt them to ask questions during their next physician's visit about hypertension care (2) the control condition - Web-based preventive health feedback, based on the individual's self-report of receiving preventive care (e.g., pap testing), to prompt them to ask questions during their next physician's visit about preventive care. The primary outcome of the study is change in blood pressure and change in the percentage of patients in each group with controlled blood pressure. Conclusion: Five hundred participants were enrolled and baseline characteristics include a mean age of 60.0. years; 57.6{\%} female; and 77.6{\%} white. Overall 37.7{\%} participants had uncontrolled blood pressure; the mean body mass index (BMI) was in the obese range (32.4) and 21.8{\%} had diabetes. By activating patients to become involved in their own care, we believe the addition of the web-based intervention will improve blood pressure control compared to a control group who receive web-based preventive messages unrelated to hypertension.",
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A web-based patient activation intervention to improve hypertension care : Study design and baseline characteristics in the web hypertension study. / Thiboutot, Jeffrey; Stuckey, Heather; Binette, Aja; Kephart, Donna; Curry, William; Falkner, Bonita; Sciamanna, Christopher.

In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, Vol. 31, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 634-646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A web-based patient activation intervention to improve hypertension care

T2 - Study design and baseline characteristics in the web hypertension study

AU - Thiboutot, Jeffrey

AU - Stuckey, Heather

AU - Binette, Aja

AU - Kephart, Donna

AU - Curry, William

AU - Falkner, Bonita

AU - Sciamanna, Christopher

PY - 2010/11/1

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