A workplace intervention improves sleep: Results from the randomized controlled Work, Family, and Health Study

Ryan Olson, Tori L. Crain, Todd E. Bodner, Rosalind King, Leslie B. Hammer, Laura Klein, Leslie Erickson, Phyllis Moen, Lisa F. Berkman, Orfeu M. Buxton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study objectives: The Work, Family, and Health Network Study tested the hypothesis that a workplace intervention designed to increase family-supportive supervision and employee control over work time improves actigraphic measures of sleep quantity and quality. Design: Cluster-randomized trial. Setting: A global information technology firm. Participants: US employees at an information technology firm. Interventions: Randomly selected clusters of managers and employees participated in a 3-month, social, and organizational change process intended to reduce work-family conflict. The intervention included interactive sessions with facilitated discussions, role playing, and games. Managers completed training in family-supportive supervision. Measurements and results: Primary outcomes of total sleep time (sleep duration) and wake after sleep onset (sleep quality) were collected from week-long actigraphy recordings at baseline and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included self-reported sleep insufficiency and insomnia symptoms. Twelve-month interviews were completed by 701 (93% retention), of whom 595 (85%) completed actigraphy. Restricting analyses to participants with ≥ 3 valid days of actigraphy yielded a sample of 473-474 for intervention effectiveness analyses. Actigraphy-measured sleep duration was 8 min/d greater among intervention employees relative to controls (P < .05). Sleep insufficiency was reduced among intervention employees (P = .002). Wake after sleep onset and insomnia symptoms were not different between groups. Path models indicated that increased control over work hours and subsequent reductions in work-family conflict mediated the improvement in sleep sufficiency. Conclusions: The workplace intervention did not overtly address sleep, yet intervention employees slept 8 min/d more and reported greater sleep sufficiency. Interventions should address environmental and psychosocial causes of sleep deficiency, including workplace factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-65
Number of pages11
JournalSleep health
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015

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Family Health
Workplace
Sleep
Actigraphy
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Role Playing
Technology
Organizational Innovation
Social Change

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Olson, Ryan ; Crain, Tori L. ; Bodner, Todd E. ; King, Rosalind ; Hammer, Leslie B. ; Klein, Laura ; Erickson, Leslie ; Moen, Phyllis ; Berkman, Lisa F. ; Buxton, Orfeu M. / A workplace intervention improves sleep : Results from the randomized controlled Work, Family, and Health Study. In: Sleep health. 2015 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 55-65.
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Olson, R, Crain, TL, Bodner, TE, King, R, Hammer, LB, Klein, L, Erickson, L, Moen, P, Berkman, LF & Buxton, OM 2015, 'A workplace intervention improves sleep: Results from the randomized controlled Work, Family, and Health Study', Sleep health, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 55-65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sleh.2014.11.003

A workplace intervention improves sleep : Results from the randomized controlled Work, Family, and Health Study. / Olson, Ryan; Crain, Tori L.; Bodner, Todd E.; King, Rosalind; Hammer, Leslie B.; Klein, Laura; Erickson, Leslie; Moen, Phyllis; Berkman, Lisa F.; Buxton, Orfeu M.

In: Sleep health, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.03.2015, p. 55-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Crain, Tori L.

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AU - King, Rosalind

AU - Hammer, Leslie B.

AU - Klein, Laura

AU - Erickson, Leslie

AU - Moen, Phyllis

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AU - Buxton, Orfeu M.

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N2 - Study objectives: The Work, Family, and Health Network Study tested the hypothesis that a workplace intervention designed to increase family-supportive supervision and employee control over work time improves actigraphic measures of sleep quantity and quality. Design: Cluster-randomized trial. Setting: A global information technology firm. Participants: US employees at an information technology firm. Interventions: Randomly selected clusters of managers and employees participated in a 3-month, social, and organizational change process intended to reduce work-family conflict. The intervention included interactive sessions with facilitated discussions, role playing, and games. Managers completed training in family-supportive supervision. Measurements and results: Primary outcomes of total sleep time (sleep duration) and wake after sleep onset (sleep quality) were collected from week-long actigraphy recordings at baseline and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included self-reported sleep insufficiency and insomnia symptoms. Twelve-month interviews were completed by 701 (93% retention), of whom 595 (85%) completed actigraphy. Restricting analyses to participants with ≥ 3 valid days of actigraphy yielded a sample of 473-474 for intervention effectiveness analyses. Actigraphy-measured sleep duration was 8 min/d greater among intervention employees relative to controls (P < .05). Sleep insufficiency was reduced among intervention employees (P = .002). Wake after sleep onset and insomnia symptoms were not different between groups. Path models indicated that increased control over work hours and subsequent reductions in work-family conflict mediated the improvement in sleep sufficiency. Conclusions: The workplace intervention did not overtly address sleep, yet intervention employees slept 8 min/d more and reported greater sleep sufficiency. Interventions should address environmental and psychosocial causes of sleep deficiency, including workplace factors.

AB - Study objectives: The Work, Family, and Health Network Study tested the hypothesis that a workplace intervention designed to increase family-supportive supervision and employee control over work time improves actigraphic measures of sleep quantity and quality. Design: Cluster-randomized trial. Setting: A global information technology firm. Participants: US employees at an information technology firm. Interventions: Randomly selected clusters of managers and employees participated in a 3-month, social, and organizational change process intended to reduce work-family conflict. The intervention included interactive sessions with facilitated discussions, role playing, and games. Managers completed training in family-supportive supervision. Measurements and results: Primary outcomes of total sleep time (sleep duration) and wake after sleep onset (sleep quality) were collected from week-long actigraphy recordings at baseline and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included self-reported sleep insufficiency and insomnia symptoms. Twelve-month interviews were completed by 701 (93% retention), of whom 595 (85%) completed actigraphy. Restricting analyses to participants with ≥ 3 valid days of actigraphy yielded a sample of 473-474 for intervention effectiveness analyses. Actigraphy-measured sleep duration was 8 min/d greater among intervention employees relative to controls (P < .05). Sleep insufficiency was reduced among intervention employees (P = .002). Wake after sleep onset and insomnia symptoms were not different between groups. Path models indicated that increased control over work hours and subsequent reductions in work-family conflict mediated the improvement in sleep sufficiency. Conclusions: The workplace intervention did not overtly address sleep, yet intervention employees slept 8 min/d more and reported greater sleep sufficiency. Interventions should address environmental and psychosocial causes of sleep deficiency, including workplace factors.

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