A workshop for nursing home staff: Recognizing and responding to their own and residents’ emotions

Katy Ruckdeschel, Kimberly Van Haitsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An appreciation for the emotion work required of nursing home staff suggests that caregiver education should address the skills of emotional intelligence. Although the number of training efforts geared toward paraprofessionals is growing, few programs address caregivers’ emotional skills, and fewer still have their roots in research. After providing background on resident-centered care, caring for the caregiver, and emotions in dementia, this paper describes a research-based workshop that promotes nursing home staff’s skills in emotional intelligence. The first segment of the workshop introduces the importance of being aware of one’s feelings and controlling impulses, and discusses how to manage one’s own emotions. The second segment focuses on recognizing residents’ emotions and helping residents manage their emotions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-51
Number of pages13
JournalGerontology and Geriatrics Education
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 8 2004

Fingerprint

Nursing Staff
nursing home
Nursing Homes
Emotions
emotion
resident
staff
Education
caregiver
emotional intelligence
Caregivers
Emotional Intelligence
dementia
Research
Dementia
education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

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A workshop for nursing home staff : Recognizing and responding to their own and residents’ emotions. / Ruckdeschel, Katy; Van Haitsma, Kimberly.

In: Gerontology and Geriatrics Education, Vol. 24, No. 3, 08.03.2004, p. 39-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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