A young male runner with a posterior knee mass - Not just your typical Baker's cyst

Ayesha Abid, James Fitzhugh Kelley, Donald Flemming, Matthew Silvis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We present the case of a 28-year-old man with a growing mass in his right popliteal fossa causing pain on exertion. The differential diagnosis included Baker's cyst, entrapment syndrome of the popliteal artery, as well as a benign or malignant neoplasm. An ultrasound was nonspecific. Follow-up MRI of the knee demonstrated cystic adventitial disease (CAD). With only about 500 cases reported in the literature since its discovery in 1947, CAD is a rare entity. The disease is characterised by mucinous or gelatinous cysts in the arterial or venous adventitia. The disease is predominantly seen in the popliteal artery and typically affects otherwise healthy males in the fourth to fifth decade of life. It presents clinically as intermittent exertional claudication. Examination of our case and a review of the literature will highlight the importance of considering CAD in patients who report of a popliteal mass and intermittent claudication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number213750
JournalBMJ case reports
Volume2016
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Popliteal Cyst
Adventitia
Knee
Popliteal Artery
Intermittent Claudication
Cysts
Differential Diagnosis
Pain
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "We present the case of a 28-year-old man with a growing mass in his right popliteal fossa causing pain on exertion. The differential diagnosis included Baker's cyst, entrapment syndrome of the popliteal artery, as well as a benign or malignant neoplasm. An ultrasound was nonspecific. Follow-up MRI of the knee demonstrated cystic adventitial disease (CAD). With only about 500 cases reported in the literature since its discovery in 1947, CAD is a rare entity. The disease is characterised by mucinous or gelatinous cysts in the arterial or venous adventitia. The disease is predominantly seen in the popliteal artery and typically affects otherwise healthy males in the fourth to fifth decade of life. It presents clinically as intermittent exertional claudication. Examination of our case and a review of the literature will highlight the importance of considering CAD in patients who report of a popliteal mass and intermittent claudication.",
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A young male runner with a posterior knee mass - Not just your typical Baker's cyst. / Abid, Ayesha; Kelley, James Fitzhugh; Flemming, Donald; Silvis, Matthew.

In: BMJ case reports, Vol. 2016, 213750, 01.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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