Ablation of SP-A has a negative impact on the susceptibility of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection after ozone exposure: Sex differences

Anatoly N. Mikerov, Rizwanul Haque, Xiaozhuang Gan, Xiaoxuan Guo, David S. Phelps, Joanna Floros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Surfactant protein A (SP-A) enhances phagocytosis of bacteria, including Klebsiella pneumoniae, by alveolar macrophages. Ozone, a major air pollutant, can cause oxidation of surfactant and may influence lung immune function. Immune function may also be affected by sex-specific mechanisms. We hypothesized that ablation of SP-A has a negative impact on the susceptibility of mice to Klebsiella pneumoniae infection after ozone exposure, and that sex differences in the effect of ozone do exist.Methods: Male and female SP-A (-/-) mice on the C57BL/6J background were exposed to ozone or to filtered air (FA) used as a control and then infected intratracheally with K. pneumoniae bacteria. Survival rate was monitored during a 14-day period. In addition, protein oxidation levels and in vivo phagocytosis were checked 1 h after inoculation of PBS used as a sham control and after inoculation of K. pneumoniae bacteria in PBS, respectively.Results: We found: 1) ozone exposure followed by K. pneumoniae infection decreases survival and alveolar macrophage phagocytic function of SP-A (-/-) mice compared to filtered air exposure (p < 0.05), and females are more affected than males; 2) SP-A (-/-) mice (exposed either to ozone or FA) are more susceptible to infection with K. pneumoniae than wild type (WT) mice regarding their survival rate and macrophage phagocytic function; the phagocytic function of FA SP-A(-/-) is similar to that of ozone exposed WT. 3) ozone exposure appears to increase infiltration of PMNs, total protein, and SP-A oxidation in WT mice; infiltration of PMNs and total protein oxidation appears to be more pronounced in female mice in response to ozone; 4) ozone exposure increases SP-A oxidation in WT females significantly more than in males.Conclusion: Absence (i.e. ablation of SP-A in SP-A (-/-) mice) or reduction of functional activity of SP-A (i.e. oxidation of SP-A in WT mice) increases the susceptibility of mice to experimental pneumonia after ozone exposure, and in both cases females are more affected by ozone exposure than males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number77
JournalRespiratory research
Volume9
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2008

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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