Abundance of the long-nosed Leopard Lizard (Gambelia wislizeni) is influenced by shrub diversity and cover in Southeast Oregon

John E. Steffen, Roger A. Anderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The abundance and distribution of animal species appears to be limited by availability of suitable habitat, and often a critical component to these suitable habitats is the presence of one or more particular plant species, and/or plant species diversity. Abundance of the Long-nosed Leopard Lizard (Gambelia wislizenii) is inversely related to percent cover by all shrubs combined, in addition to percent cover by sagebrush, throughout the Alvord Desert in southeast Oregon. In many locales throughout the Great Basin desert sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) is the dominant shrub, and its abundance is inversely related to shrub species diversity. However, in the Alvord basin, where there are abundant dry lake beds and salt-flats, G. wislizenii lizard abundance is relatively high, percent cover by shrubs varies and shrub species diversity can be high. In these areas Greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus) is the dominant shrub, while sagebrush is non-abundant. Gambelia wislizenii population density patterns are discussed in light of putative uses of these shrub communities by Gambelia and other lizards, as well as recreational vehicles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-207
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Midland Naturalist
Volume156
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

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lizard
shrub
shrubs
Sarcobatus vermiculatus
Artemisia
species diversity
recreational vehicles
lizards
deserts
desert
basins
Artemisia tridentata
habitat
Gambelia wislizenii
Gambelia
habitats
basin
population density
salt
salts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

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Abundance of the long-nosed Leopard Lizard (Gambelia wislizeni) is influenced by shrub diversity and cover in Southeast Oregon. / Steffen, John E.; Anderson, Roger A.

In: American Midland Naturalist, Vol. 156, No. 1, 01.07.2006, p. 201-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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