Abusive Coworker Treatment, Coworker Support, and Employee Turnover

Michael J. Tews, Jr., John W. Michel, Kathryn Stafford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hostile treatment from others at work can have undesirable consequences. The present study aims to validate this proposition by examining whether abusive coworker treatment is a significant predictor of employee turnover among entry-level employees in the hospitality industry. With a sample of 979 restaurant servers, this research examined the impact of abusive coworker treatment along with coworker emotional and instrumental support on turnover over a 6-month period. Abusive coworker treatment was significantly related to higher turnover among newcomers but not among experienced employees. Furthermore, coworker emotional support was related to lower turnover among all employees in the sample. These findings provide a more nuanced perspective on the role of abusive coworker treatment and coworker support in combating the perennial turnover challenge in the hospitality industry.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)413-423
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Leadership and Organizational Studies
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2019

Fingerprint

co-worker
turnover
employee
entry level
industry
Employee turnover
Turnover
Employees
Hospitality industry
Emotion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

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Abusive Coworker Treatment, Coworker Support, and Employee Turnover. / Tews, Jr., Michael J.; Michel, John W.; Stafford, Kathryn.

In: Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.11.2019, p. 413-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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