Academic growth trajectories and family relationships among African American youth

Aryn M. Dotterer, Katie Lowe, Susan Marie McHale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored trajectories of African American youths' academic functioning and assessed whether changes in parent-adolescent relationships were associated with changes in youths' academic functioning. The data were drawn from a 3-year longitudinal study of gender socialization and development in two-parent African American families and included 197 families. Findings revealed gender differences in achievement trajectories and indicated that boys not only had lower levels of academic achievement compared to girls, but also experienced steeper declines in school self-esteem during adolescence. Changes in parent-adolescent relationship quality were linked to changes in academic functioning: Increases in conflict were related to decreases in GPA, school bonding, and school self-esteem and increases in warmth were related to increases in school bonding and school self-esteem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-747
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Research on Adolescence
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Family Relations
African Americans
Self Concept
self-esteem
Growth
parents
school
adolescent
Socialization
academic achievement
socialization
adolescence
Longitudinal Studies
gender-specific factors
longitudinal study
American
gender
Object Attachment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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Academic growth trajectories and family relationships among African American youth. / Dotterer, Aryn M.; Lowe, Katie; McHale, Susan Marie.

In: Journal of Research on Adolescence, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.12.2014, p. 734-747.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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