Academic library administrators' perceptions of four instructional skills

John D. Shank, Nancy H. Dewald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study seeks to fill a gap in the literature by examining the perceptions of current administrators toward four domains and their associated skill sets needed to fulfill the library's instructional role. Hundreds of Library Directors/Deans/Associate Deans/Heads in academic libraries of all sizes across the United States were surveyed to determine to what extent they value the skill sets associated with the four selected instructional skill domains: two traditional-teaching and presentation-and two more recently adopted by librarians-instructional design and educational technology. The findings of this research indicate that library administrators value the traditional skill sets more than the newer nontraditional skills. The results and possible implications, as well as directions future studies can take, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-93
Number of pages16
JournalCollege and Research Libraries
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

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educational technology
director
Values
librarian
Teaching
literature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

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Academic library administrators' perceptions of four instructional skills. / Shank, John D.; Dewald, Nancy H.

In: College and Research Libraries, Vol. 73, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 78-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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