Academic task persistence of normally achieving ADHD and control boys: Performance, self-evaluations, and attributions

Betsy Hoza, Daniel A. Waschbusch, William E. Pelham, Heidi Kipp, Julie Sarno Owens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Scopus citations

Abstract

The authors examined academic task persistence, pretask expectancies, self-evaluations, and attributions of boys with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as compared with control boys. Participants were 83 ADHD boys and 66 control boys, all normally achieving. Prior to the task, performance expectancies were assessed. After a success-failure manipulation with find-a-word puzzles, performance on subsequent trials, self-evaluations, and attributions were evaluated. Compared with controls, ADHD boys solved fewer test puzzles, quit working more often, and found fewer words on a generalization task. Consistent with these behavioral findings, research assistants rated ADHD boys as less effortful and less cooperative than control boys. Although ADHD boys did not differ significantly from controls in their posttask self-evaluations, they did differ significantly from controls in some aspects of their attributions. Attributional data indicated that ADHD boys endorsed luck as a reason for success more strongly and lack of effort as a reason for failure less strongly than controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-283
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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