Acceptability of mobile health interventions to reduce inactivity-related health risk in central Pennsylvania adults

Chih Hsiang Yang, Jaclyn P. Maher, David E. Conroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insufficient physical activity and excessive sedentary behavior elevate health risk. Mobile applications (apps) provide one mode for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors and reduce health risk. The purpose of this study was to characterize the need for and acceptability of health behavior interventions among rural adults and evaluate the interest in and the value of app-based interventions in this population. Central Pennsylvania adults with smartphones (N. = 258) completed a brief web survey in October-November 2012. Most adults report one or both inactivity-related behavioral risk factors, would use a free app to modify those risk behaviors, and would pay a small amount for that app. Low-cost, efficacious apps to increase physical activity or reduce sedentary behavior should be promoted in public health practice. User experience should be at the forefront of this process to increase value and minimize burden in the service of long-term engagement, behavior change, and health risk reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-672
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 13 2015

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Telemedicine
Health
Mobile Applications
Public Health Practice
Health Behavior
Risk Reduction Behavior
Risk-Taking
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Informatics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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abstract = "Insufficient physical activity and excessive sedentary behavior elevate health risk. Mobile applications (apps) provide one mode for delivering interventions to modify these behaviors and reduce health risk. The purpose of this study was to characterize the need for and acceptability of health behavior interventions among rural adults and evaluate the interest in and the value of app-based interventions in this population. Central Pennsylvania adults with smartphones (N. = 258) completed a brief web survey in October-November 2012. Most adults report one or both inactivity-related behavioral risk factors, would use a free app to modify those risk behaviors, and would pay a small amount for that app. Low-cost, efficacious apps to increase physical activity or reduce sedentary behavior should be promoted in public health practice. User experience should be at the forefront of this process to increase value and minimize burden in the service of long-term engagement, behavior change, and health risk reduction.",
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Acceptability of mobile health interventions to reduce inactivity-related health risk in central Pennsylvania adults. / Yang, Chih Hsiang; Maher, Jaclyn P.; Conroy, David E.

In: Preventive Medicine Reports, Vol. 2, 13.08.2015, p. 669-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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