Achievement goal orientation and differences in self-reported copying behaviour across academic programmes

Alisa Songsriwittaya, Ravinder Koul, Sak Kongsuwan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This survey study investigated the relationship between achievement goal orientation and self-reported copying behaviour among college students (N = 2007) enrolled in five different academic programmes in Thailand. Results of statistical analysis showed several significant findings: performance approach goal orientation, performance avoidance goal orientation, academic major in humanities, gender and grade point average were the best predictors of self-reported frequency of copying behaviour. Compared with humanities students, management, engineering, science and vocational students were significantly more performance avoidance goal oriented and reported significantly higher frequency of copying behaviour. We primarily use achievement goal theory to interpret the effect of multiple goal orientations on self-reported copying behaviour across academic programmes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-430
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Further and Higher Education
Volume34
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

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performance
engineering science
student
Thailand
statistical analysis
gender
management

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Achievement goal orientation and differences in self-reported copying behaviour across academic programmes. / Songsriwittaya, Alisa; Koul, Ravinder; Kongsuwan, Sak.

In: Journal of Further and Higher Education, Vol. 34, No. 3, 01.08.2010, p. 419-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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