Acquisition of intellectual and perceptual-motor skills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

169 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent evidence indicates that intellectual and perceptual-motor skills are acquired in fundamentally similar ways. Transfer specificity, generativity, and the use of abstract rules and reflexlike productions are similar in the two skill domains; brain sites subserving thought processes and perceptual-motor processes are not as distinct as once thought; explicit and implicit knowledge characterize both kinds of skill; learning rates, training effects, and learning stages are remarkably similar for the two skill classes; and imagery, long thought to play a distinctive role in high-level thought, also plays a role in perceptual-motor learning and control. The conclusion that intellectual skills and perceptual-motor skills are psychologically more alike than different accords with the view that all knowledge is performatory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)453-470
Number of pages18
JournalAnnual Review of Psychology
Volume52
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Motor Skills
Learning
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Brain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Acquisition of intellectual and perceptual-motor skills. / Rosenbaum, David A.; Carlson, Richard Alan; Gilmore, Rick Owen.

In: Annual Review of Psychology, Vol. 52, 2001, p. 453-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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