ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Colorectal Cancer Screening

Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging:

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review summarizes the relevant literature regarding colorectal screening with imaging. For individuals at average or moderate risk for colorectal cancer, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening. After positive results on a fecal occult blood test or immunohistochemical test, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer detection. For individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer (eg, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn colitis), optical colonoscopy is preferred because of its ability to obtain biopsies to detect dysplasia. After incomplete colonoscopy, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening for individuals at average, moderate, or high risk. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S56-S68
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018

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Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Computed Tomographic Colonography
Colonoscopy
Guidelines
Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Neoplasms
Occult Blood
Expert Testimony
Hematologic Tests
Colitis
Ulcerative Colitis
Radiology
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging:. / ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Colorectal Cancer Screening In: Journal of the American College of Radiology. 2018 ; Vol. 15, No. 5. pp. S56-S68.
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ACR Appropriateness Criteria ® Colorectal Cancer Screening . / Expert Panel on Gastrointestinal Imaging:.

In: Journal of the American College of Radiology, Vol. 15, No. 5, 05.2018, p. S56-S68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Moreno, Courtney

AU - Kim, David H.

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AU - Chang, Kevin J.

AU - Feig, Barry W.

AU - Fowler, Kathryn J.

AU - Garcia, Evelyn M.

AU - Kambadakone, Avinash R.

AU - Lambert, Drew L.

AU - Levy, Angela D.

AU - Marin, Daniele

AU - Peterson, Christine M.

AU - Scheirey, Christopher D.

AU - Smith, Martin P.

AU - Weinstein, Stefanie

AU - Carucci, Laura R.

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N2 - This review summarizes the relevant literature regarding colorectal screening with imaging. For individuals at average or moderate risk for colorectal cancer, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening. After positive results on a fecal occult blood test or immunohistochemical test, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer detection. For individuals at high risk for colorectal cancer (eg, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn colitis), optical colonoscopy is preferred because of its ability to obtain biopsies to detect dysplasia. After incomplete colonoscopy, CT colonography is usually appropriate for colorectal cancer screening for individuals at average, moderate, or high risk. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

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