Actions Taken by Women in Response to Intimate Partner Violence and Intimate Partner Violence Status at 1-Year Follow-Up

Molly K. Parker, Erik B. Lehman, Marie Claire Abram, Carol S. Weisman, Jennifer S. McCall-Hosenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pervasive public health issue with significant physical and mental health sequelae. A longer duration and greater severity of abuse are associated with adverse health outcomes and increased risk of revictimization. Current research has identified a variety of strategies used by women in response to abuse, but has not established whether the use of these strategies is associated with decreased IPV over time. For this study, we analyzed the associations between the use of specific actions in response to abuse—placating, resistance, informal or formal network help-seeking, safety planning, and substance use—and IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up. Methods: Ninety-five women with past-year IPV at baseline participated in a 1-year follow-up survey measuring their use of specific actions in response to IPV and subsequent IPV status. IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up was analyzed as a function of types of actions taken and sociodemographic variables. Results: Among women with past-year IPV at baseline (N = 95), 53% reported no further IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up. In bivariate analysis, social support was associated with decreased risk of IPV victimization (odds ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18–0.99). In multivariable analyses, high use of placating (adjusted odds ratio, 9.40; 95% CI, 2.53–34.9), formal network help-seeking (adjusted odds ratio, 7.26; 95% CI, 1.97–26.74), and safety planning (adjusted odds ratio, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.02–8.69) strategies were associated with an increased risk of IPV victimization at the 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that IPV exposure can change over time and that the use of specific actions in response to IPV can be indicators of risk of subsequent victimization. Abuse severity is an important potential confounder of action efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)330-337
Number of pages8
JournalWomen's Health Issues
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Maternity and Midwifery

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