Activating and suppressing hostile and benevolent racism: Evidence for comparative media stereotyping

Srividya Ramasubramanian, Mary Beth Oliver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

This research examines the role of media literacy training and counter-stereotypical news stones in prejudice reduction. Research participants read either stereotypical or counter-stereotypical news stories after exposure to a media literacy video or a control video. After this, they completed a paper-and-pencil questionnaire that included Likert-type scales and feeling-thermometer ratings about their feelings toward African-Americans, Asian-Indians, and Caucasian-Americans. The findings reveal that hostile prejudice is more likely to be expressed toward African-Americans and benevolent prejudice is more likely to be expressed toward Asian-Indians. As predicted, counter-stereotypical news stories as compared to stereotypical news stories decrease prejudice toward Asian-Indians. Contrary to expectations, the media literacy video seems to prime prejudices rather than suppress them, Interestingly, news stories about Asian-Indians increase hostility toward African-Americans. These comparative stereotyping are explained using modern racist beliefs and model minority stereotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-646
Number of pages24
JournalMedia Psychology
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology

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