Acute and chronic pain management in palliative care

Vitaly Gordin, Michael A. Weaver, Marc B. Hahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Every palliative care patient should have the expectation that acute and chronic pain management will be an integral part of their overall care. However, in all too many instances, the pain of cancer is often grossly under-treated. This issue is of concern because more than 80% of patients with cancer pain can find adequate relief through the use of simple pharmacological methods. It is even more troubling to note that women and minority groups have their cancer pain under-treated more frequently. Physicians with the basic skills of assessment and treatment will be able to control the symptoms in the majority of cancer pain patients. However, there are still some patients who may require other modalities to control their moderate to severe pain. A thorough understanding of all pain management options will help the gynaecological oncologist to maintain an acceptable quality of life for their patients throughout the therapeutic and palliative phases of care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-234
Number of pages32
JournalBest Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Acute Pain
Pain Management
Palliative Care
Chronic Pain
Minority Groups
Quality of Life
Pharmacology
Physicians
Pain
Cancer Pain
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

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Acute and chronic pain management in palliative care. / Gordin, Vitaly; Weaver, Michael A.; Hahn, Marc B.

In: Best Practice and Research: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vol. 15, No. 2, 01.01.2001, p. 203-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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