Acute peanut consumption alters postprandial lipids and vascular responses in healthy overweight or obese men

Xiaoran Liu, Alison M. Hill, Sheila Grace West, Rachel M. Gabauer, Cindy E. McCrea, Jennifer Anne Fleming, Penny Margaret Kris-Etherton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Postprandial hyperlipidemia is associated with impaired endothelial function. Peanut consumption favorably affects the lipid and lipoprotein profile; however, the effects on endothelial function remain unclear. Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of acute peanut consumption as part of a high-fat meal on postprandial endothelial function. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, crossover postprandial study to evaluate the effect of acute peanut consumption on postprandial lipids and endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery in 15 healthy overweight or obese men [mean age: 26.7 y; mean body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.4]. Participants consumed, in a randomized order, a peanutmeal containing 3 ounces (85 g) ground peanuts (1198 kcal; 40.0%carbohydrate, 47.7% fat, 19.4% saturated fat, 13.2% protein) and a control meal matched for energy and macronutrient content. Meals were in the form of a shake, scheduled ≥1 wk apart. Lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, and insulin were measured at baseline (0 min) and at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after shake consumption. FMD was measured at baseline and at 240 min. Results: Acute peanut consumption blunted the serum triglyceride (TG) response 120 and 240 min after consumption compared with the control meal (means ± SEMs-120 min: 188.9 ± 19.4 compared with 197.5 ± 20.7 mg/dL; 240 min: 189.9 ± 24.3 compared with 197.3 ± 18.4 mg/dL; P < 0.05 for both). Total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and glucose and insulin responses were similar between the test meals. Compared with baseline, only the control meal significantly decreased FMD at 240 min (control: -1.2% ± 0.5%; P = 0.029; peanut:-0.6% ± 0.5%; P = 0.3). Participants with higher baseline total ( > 150 mg/dL) and LDL ( > 100 mg/dL)-cholesterol concentrations showed a significant decrease in FMD after the control meal (-1.8%, P = 0.017; -2.0%, P = 0.038), whereas the peanut meal maintained endothelial function in all participants irrespective of total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations. Conclusion: The inclusion of 85 g peanuts (3 ounces) as part of a high-fat meal improved the postprandial TG response and preserved endothelial function in healthy overweight or obese men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)835-840
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume147
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Blood Vessels
Meals
Lipids
Fats
Dilatation
Lipoproteins
Triglycerides
Brachial Artery
Arachis
Hyperlipidemias
LDL Cholesterol
Cross-Over Studies
Body Mass Index
Cholesterol
Carbohydrates
Insulin
Glucose
Serum
Proteins

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

@article{74f4e0f818934f8db9ea11681b747141,
title = "Acute peanut consumption alters postprandial lipids and vascular responses in healthy overweight or obese men",
abstract = "Background: Postprandial hyperlipidemia is associated with impaired endothelial function. Peanut consumption favorably affects the lipid and lipoprotein profile; however, the effects on endothelial function remain unclear. Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of acute peanut consumption as part of a high-fat meal on postprandial endothelial function. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, crossover postprandial study to evaluate the effect of acute peanut consumption on postprandial lipids and endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery in 15 healthy overweight or obese men [mean age: 26.7 y; mean body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.4]. Participants consumed, in a randomized order, a peanutmeal containing 3 ounces (85 g) ground peanuts (1198 kcal; 40.0{\%}carbohydrate, 47.7{\%} fat, 19.4{\%} saturated fat, 13.2{\%} protein) and a control meal matched for energy and macronutrient content. Meals were in the form of a shake, scheduled ≥1 wk apart. Lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, and insulin were measured at baseline (0 min) and at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after shake consumption. FMD was measured at baseline and at 240 min. Results: Acute peanut consumption blunted the serum triglyceride (TG) response 120 and 240 min after consumption compared with the control meal (means ± SEMs-120 min: 188.9 ± 19.4 compared with 197.5 ± 20.7 mg/dL; 240 min: 189.9 ± 24.3 compared with 197.3 ± 18.4 mg/dL; P < 0.05 for both). Total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and glucose and insulin responses were similar between the test meals. Compared with baseline, only the control meal significantly decreased FMD at 240 min (control: -1.2{\%} ± 0.5{\%}; P = 0.029; peanut:-0.6{\%} ± 0.5{\%}; P = 0.3). Participants with higher baseline total ( > 150 mg/dL) and LDL ( > 100 mg/dL)-cholesterol concentrations showed a significant decrease in FMD after the control meal (-1.8{\%}, P = 0.017; -2.0{\%}, P = 0.038), whereas the peanut meal maintained endothelial function in all participants irrespective of total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations. Conclusion: The inclusion of 85 g peanuts (3 ounces) as part of a high-fat meal improved the postprandial TG response and preserved endothelial function in healthy overweight or obese men.",
author = "Xiaoran Liu and Hill, {Alison M.} and West, {Sheila Grace} and Gabauer, {Rachel M.} and McCrea, {Cindy E.} and Fleming, {Jennifer Anne} and Kris-Etherton, {Penny Margaret}",
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month = "1",
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doi = "10.3945/jn.116.246785",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "147",
pages = "835--840",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
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Acute peanut consumption alters postprandial lipids and vascular responses in healthy overweight or obese men. / Liu, Xiaoran; Hill, Alison M.; West, Sheila Grace; Gabauer, Rachel M.; McCrea, Cindy E.; Fleming, Jennifer Anne; Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 147, No. 5, 01.01.2017, p. 835-840.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute peanut consumption alters postprandial lipids and vascular responses in healthy overweight or obese men

AU - Liu, Xiaoran

AU - Hill, Alison M.

AU - West, Sheila Grace

AU - Gabauer, Rachel M.

AU - McCrea, Cindy E.

AU - Fleming, Jennifer Anne

AU - Kris-Etherton, Penny Margaret

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background: Postprandial hyperlipidemia is associated with impaired endothelial function. Peanut consumption favorably affects the lipid and lipoprotein profile; however, the effects on endothelial function remain unclear. Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of acute peanut consumption as part of a high-fat meal on postprandial endothelial function. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, crossover postprandial study to evaluate the effect of acute peanut consumption on postprandial lipids and endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery in 15 healthy overweight or obese men [mean age: 26.7 y; mean body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.4]. Participants consumed, in a randomized order, a peanutmeal containing 3 ounces (85 g) ground peanuts (1198 kcal; 40.0%carbohydrate, 47.7% fat, 19.4% saturated fat, 13.2% protein) and a control meal matched for energy and macronutrient content. Meals were in the form of a shake, scheduled ≥1 wk apart. Lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, and insulin were measured at baseline (0 min) and at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after shake consumption. FMD was measured at baseline and at 240 min. Results: Acute peanut consumption blunted the serum triglyceride (TG) response 120 and 240 min after consumption compared with the control meal (means ± SEMs-120 min: 188.9 ± 19.4 compared with 197.5 ± 20.7 mg/dL; 240 min: 189.9 ± 24.3 compared with 197.3 ± 18.4 mg/dL; P < 0.05 for both). Total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and glucose and insulin responses were similar between the test meals. Compared with baseline, only the control meal significantly decreased FMD at 240 min (control: -1.2% ± 0.5%; P = 0.029; peanut:-0.6% ± 0.5%; P = 0.3). Participants with higher baseline total ( > 150 mg/dL) and LDL ( > 100 mg/dL)-cholesterol concentrations showed a significant decrease in FMD after the control meal (-1.8%, P = 0.017; -2.0%, P = 0.038), whereas the peanut meal maintained endothelial function in all participants irrespective of total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations. Conclusion: The inclusion of 85 g peanuts (3 ounces) as part of a high-fat meal improved the postprandial TG response and preserved endothelial function in healthy overweight or obese men.

AB - Background: Postprandial hyperlipidemia is associated with impaired endothelial function. Peanut consumption favorably affects the lipid and lipoprotein profile; however, the effects on endothelial function remain unclear. Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of acute peanut consumption as part of a high-fat meal on postprandial endothelial function. Methods: We conducted a randomized, controlled, crossover postprandial study to evaluate the effect of acute peanut consumption on postprandial lipids and endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery in 15 healthy overweight or obese men [mean age: 26.7 y; mean body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.4]. Participants consumed, in a randomized order, a peanutmeal containing 3 ounces (85 g) ground peanuts (1198 kcal; 40.0%carbohydrate, 47.7% fat, 19.4% saturated fat, 13.2% protein) and a control meal matched for energy and macronutrient content. Meals were in the form of a shake, scheduled ≥1 wk apart. Lipids, lipoproteins, glucose, and insulin were measured at baseline (0 min) and at 30, 60, 120, and 240 min after shake consumption. FMD was measured at baseline and at 240 min. Results: Acute peanut consumption blunted the serum triglyceride (TG) response 120 and 240 min after consumption compared with the control meal (means ± SEMs-120 min: 188.9 ± 19.4 compared with 197.5 ± 20.7 mg/dL; 240 min: 189.9 ± 24.3 compared with 197.3 ± 18.4 mg/dL; P < 0.05 for both). Total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and glucose and insulin responses were similar between the test meals. Compared with baseline, only the control meal significantly decreased FMD at 240 min (control: -1.2% ± 0.5%; P = 0.029; peanut:-0.6% ± 0.5%; P = 0.3). Participants with higher baseline total ( > 150 mg/dL) and LDL ( > 100 mg/dL)-cholesterol concentrations showed a significant decrease in FMD after the control meal (-1.8%, P = 0.017; -2.0%, P = 0.038), whereas the peanut meal maintained endothelial function in all participants irrespective of total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations. Conclusion: The inclusion of 85 g peanuts (3 ounces) as part of a high-fat meal improved the postprandial TG response and preserved endothelial function in healthy overweight or obese men.

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