Acute ultraviolet radiation exposure attenuates nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation in the cutaneous microvasculature of healthy humans

S. Tony Wolf, Anna E. Stanhewicz, Nina G. Jablonski, W. Larry Kenney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

5-Methyltetrahydrofolate (5- MTHF) is important for nitric oxide (NO)-mediated cutaneous microvascular vasodilation. Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation may deplete 5-MTHF, either directly or via production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), decreasing NO-mediated vasodilation. We hypothesized that 1) acute UVB exposure would attenuate NO-dependent cutaneous vasodilation, 2) local perfusion of 5-MTHF or ascorbate (ASC) (antioxidant) would augment NO-dependent vasodilation after UVB, and 3) darker skin pigmentation would be UVB-protective. Intradermal microdialysis fibers (n ± 3) placed in each forearm of 22 healthy young adults (23 ± 1 yr; 8M/14F) locally delivered lactated Ringer's (control), 5 mM 5-MTHF, or 10 mM ASC. One arm was UVBexposed (300 mJ/cm2), and the other served as a nonexposed control (CON). Following UVB exposure, a standardized local heating (42°C) protocol induced cutaneous vasodilation. After attaining a plateau blood flow, 15 mM NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (nitric oxide synthase inhibiter) was infused at all sites to quantify the NO contribution. Red cell flux was measured at each site by laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF), and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC ± LDF/ mean arterial pressure) was expressed as a percentage of maximum (28 mM sodium nitroprusside ± 43°C). UVB attenuated NOmediated vasodilatio.compared with CON (23.1 ± 3.6 vs. 33.9 ± 3.4%; P = 0.001). Delivery of 5-MTHF or ASC improved NO-mediated vasodilation versus lactated Ringer's in the UVBexposed arm (MTHF: 30.1 ± 4.8% vs. 23.1 ± 3.8%; P = 0.03; ASC: 30.9 ± 4.3% vs. 23.1 ± 3.8%; P = 0.02). Neither treatment affected the response in the nonexposed arm (P ≥ 0.09). Skin pigmentation (melanin index) was not predictive of the UVB response (P ≤ 0.34). These data suggest that acute UVB exposure attenuates NO-mediated vasodilation via direct and/or ROS-induced reductions in 5-MTHF, independent of skin pigmentation. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) contributes to normal healthy function of the human cutaneous microvasculature. Bioavailability of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF) is important for the production of NO. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure, specifically UVB, may deplete cutaneous 5-MTHF, thereby reducing NO-mediated microvascular function. Our findings suggest that acute UVB exposure attenuates NO-mediated vasodilation of the cutaneous microvasculature via degradation of 5-MTHF. These findings advance our understanding of the potential negative health impacts of acute UV exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1232-1237
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of applied physiology
Volume125
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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