Adaptationism and the anthropoid postcranium: Selection does not govern the length of the radial neck

Philip L. Reno, Melanie A. McCollum, Owen O. Lovejoy, Richard S. Meindl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The length of the radial neck has been assumed to vary in living and extinct primates in accordance with its role as a moment arm during flexion by the m. biceps brachii. We here use a simple developmental approach to investigate whether or not this trait does, in fact, vary in such a manner. We find, instead, that virtually all variation in radial neck length is explicable as a simple correlate of overall body size, and that there is no evidence to conclude that selection has separately modified radial neck length in response to differing locomotor patterns. Further implications for the interpretation of mammalian skeletal morphology are briefly discussed. (C) 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)59-67
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Morphology
Volume246
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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neck
Haplorhini
Neck
Body Size
Primates
body size

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Reno, Philip L. ; McCollum, Melanie A. ; Lovejoy, Owen O. ; Meindl, Richard S. / Adaptationism and the anthropoid postcranium : Selection does not govern the length of the radial neck. In: Journal of Morphology. 2000 ; Vol. 246, No. 2. pp. 59-67.
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Adaptationism and the anthropoid postcranium : Selection does not govern the length of the radial neck. / Reno, Philip L.; McCollum, Melanie A.; Lovejoy, Owen O.; Meindl, Richard S.

In: Journal of Morphology, Vol. 246, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 59-67.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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