Adapting ADA architectural design knowledge to product design

Groundwork for a function based approach

Shraddha C. Sangelkar, Daniel A. McAdams

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One in every seven Americans has some form of disability. The number of people with disabilities is expected to increase, perhaps significantly,1 over the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, persons with a disability remain underserved by consumer products. Product designers fail to design universal products primarily due to a lack of knowledge, tools, and experience with universal design. Though challenges to complete access remain, the design of universal architectural systems reflects a better codification of methods, guidelines, and knowledge than available to universal product design. This article reports research efforts to transfer elements of the design knowledge and tools from universal architectural design to universal product design. The research uses the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health to formally describe user function, the Functional Basis to describe product function, and actionfunction diagrams as an analytical framework to explore the interaction between user activity, limitation, and product realization. The comparison of the universal and typical architectural systems reveal relevant design differences in specific parametric realization, morphology, and function. Of these differences, parametric was the most common with functional the least common. The user activities that most frequently result in a design change are reaching followed by maintaining body position. The comparison of architectural systems to consumer products noted a common trend of a functional design change made in result to the user activity of transferring oneself.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010
Pages185-200
Number of pages16
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
EventASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010 - Montreal, QC, Canada
Duration: Aug 15 2010Aug 18 2010

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference
Volume5

Other

OtherASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010
CountryCanada
CityMontreal, QC
Period8/15/108/18/10

Fingerprint

Universal Design
Architectural Design
Architectural design
Product Design
Product design
Disability
Consumer products
Knowledge
Person
Health
Diagram
Design
Interaction
Architecture

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

Cite this

Sangelkar, S. C., & McAdams, D. A. (2010). Adapting ADA architectural design knowledge to product design: Groundwork for a function based approach. In ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010 (pp. 185-200). (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 5). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2010-28535
Sangelkar, Shraddha C. ; McAdams, Daniel A. / Adapting ADA architectural design knowledge to product design : Groundwork for a function based approach. ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010. 2010. pp. 185-200 (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference).
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Sangelkar, SC & McAdams, DA 2010, Adapting ADA architectural design knowledge to product design: Groundwork for a function based approach. in ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010. Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference, vol. 5, pp. 185-200, ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010, Montreal, QC, Canada, 8/15/10. https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2010-28535

Adapting ADA architectural design knowledge to product design : Groundwork for a function based approach. / Sangelkar, Shraddha C.; McAdams, Daniel A.

ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010. 2010. p. 185-200 (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference; Vol. 5).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Sangelkar SC, McAdams DA. Adapting ADA architectural design knowledge to product design: Groundwork for a function based approach. In ASME 2010 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, IDETC/CIE2010. 2010. p. 185-200. (Proceedings of the ASME Design Engineering Technical Conference). https://doi.org/10.1115/DETC2010-28535