Adding value in the organic sector

Characteristics of organic producer - Handlers

Lydia S. Oberholtzer, Carolyn Dimitri, Catherine Greene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sales of organic food have soared over the past decade. Although nearly all organic commodities pass through the hands of at least one intermediary on the way from the farmer to the consumer, there is a dearth of literature examining organic food marketing, especially for the middle section of the supply chain. This paper uses new survey data on organic intermediaries (organic handlers) to characterize firms that are certified to both handle and produce organic foods, or organic producer-handlers. Because of their direct link to the production level, the producer-handler has the potential to provide insight into value-added activities in the organic sector. A logistic regression is estimated in order to identify characteristics that make it more likely that a firm would be both a certified organic handler and a certified organic producer, while survey results are also used to describe some of the main challenges these producer-handlers face in handling their products. Organic producer-handlers ranked problems with ingredient procurement and supply and international trade issues as the highest barriers to growth. The model indicated that with few exceptions, many of the operational and procurement characteristics of organic producer-handlers are comparable to the entire organic handling population. However, those facilities dedicated solely to organic handling and those certified longer are more likely to be organic producer-handlers. Use of direct markets by organic handlers has the most robust relationship in the model, although marketing to natural products independent retailers and wholesalers are also important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)200-207
Number of pages8
JournalRenewable Agriculture and Food Systems
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2008

Fingerprint

Organic Food
organic foods
Marketing
direct marketing
food marketing
international trade
value added
supply chain
Biological Products
products and commodities
sales
marketing
hands
ingredients
Hand
Logistic Models
farmers
Growth
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

@article{a4d5dffd1b0b496e9fcf041776819265,
title = "Adding value in the organic sector: Characteristics of organic producer - Handlers",
abstract = "Sales of organic food have soared over the past decade. Although nearly all organic commodities pass through the hands of at least one intermediary on the way from the farmer to the consumer, there is a dearth of literature examining organic food marketing, especially for the middle section of the supply chain. This paper uses new survey data on organic intermediaries (organic handlers) to characterize firms that are certified to both handle and produce organic foods, or organic producer-handlers. Because of their direct link to the production level, the producer-handler has the potential to provide insight into value-added activities in the organic sector. A logistic regression is estimated in order to identify characteristics that make it more likely that a firm would be both a certified organic handler and a certified organic producer, while survey results are also used to describe some of the main challenges these producer-handlers face in handling their products. Organic producer-handlers ranked problems with ingredient procurement and supply and international trade issues as the highest barriers to growth. The model indicated that with few exceptions, many of the operational and procurement characteristics of organic producer-handlers are comparable to the entire organic handling population. However, those facilities dedicated solely to organic handling and those certified longer are more likely to be organic producer-handlers. Use of direct markets by organic handlers has the most robust relationship in the model, although marketing to natural products independent retailers and wholesalers are also important.",
author = "Oberholtzer, {Lydia S.} and Carolyn Dimitri and Catherine Greene",
year = "2008",
month = "8",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1017/S1742170507002177",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "200--207",
journal = "Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems",
issn = "1742-1705",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "3",

}

Adding value in the organic sector : Characteristics of organic producer - Handlers. / Oberholtzer, Lydia S.; Dimitri, Carolyn; Greene, Catherine.

In: Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems, Vol. 23, No. 3, 18.08.2008, p. 200-207.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adding value in the organic sector

T2 - Characteristics of organic producer - Handlers

AU - Oberholtzer, Lydia S.

AU - Dimitri, Carolyn

AU - Greene, Catherine

PY - 2008/8/18

Y1 - 2008/8/18

N2 - Sales of organic food have soared over the past decade. Although nearly all organic commodities pass through the hands of at least one intermediary on the way from the farmer to the consumer, there is a dearth of literature examining organic food marketing, especially for the middle section of the supply chain. This paper uses new survey data on organic intermediaries (organic handlers) to characterize firms that are certified to both handle and produce organic foods, or organic producer-handlers. Because of their direct link to the production level, the producer-handler has the potential to provide insight into value-added activities in the organic sector. A logistic regression is estimated in order to identify characteristics that make it more likely that a firm would be both a certified organic handler and a certified organic producer, while survey results are also used to describe some of the main challenges these producer-handlers face in handling their products. Organic producer-handlers ranked problems with ingredient procurement and supply and international trade issues as the highest barriers to growth. The model indicated that with few exceptions, many of the operational and procurement characteristics of organic producer-handlers are comparable to the entire organic handling population. However, those facilities dedicated solely to organic handling and those certified longer are more likely to be organic producer-handlers. Use of direct markets by organic handlers has the most robust relationship in the model, although marketing to natural products independent retailers and wholesalers are also important.

AB - Sales of organic food have soared over the past decade. Although nearly all organic commodities pass through the hands of at least one intermediary on the way from the farmer to the consumer, there is a dearth of literature examining organic food marketing, especially for the middle section of the supply chain. This paper uses new survey data on organic intermediaries (organic handlers) to characterize firms that are certified to both handle and produce organic foods, or organic producer-handlers. Because of their direct link to the production level, the producer-handler has the potential to provide insight into value-added activities in the organic sector. A logistic regression is estimated in order to identify characteristics that make it more likely that a firm would be both a certified organic handler and a certified organic producer, while survey results are also used to describe some of the main challenges these producer-handlers face in handling their products. Organic producer-handlers ranked problems with ingredient procurement and supply and international trade issues as the highest barriers to growth. The model indicated that with few exceptions, many of the operational and procurement characteristics of organic producer-handlers are comparable to the entire organic handling population. However, those facilities dedicated solely to organic handling and those certified longer are more likely to be organic producer-handlers. Use of direct markets by organic handlers has the most robust relationship in the model, although marketing to natural products independent retailers and wholesalers are also important.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=49249102001&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=49249102001&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1742170507002177

DO - 10.1017/S1742170507002177

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 200

EP - 207

JO - Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems

JF - Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems

SN - 1742-1705

IS - 3

ER -