Addressing structural violence through US reconciliation commissions: The case study of Greensboro, NC and Detroit, MI

Joshua Inwood, Derek Alderman, Melanie Barron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Across the United States, communities encumbered by violence, economic injustice, legacies of oppression and continued social, economic, and political marginalization are increasingly turning toward truth and reconciliation commissions (TRC) to address and remedy persistent inequality. While modeled after the international truth movement, TRCs in the United States are often not state-sanctioned and characterized by fundamental differences that beg the question: How are peace and justice dialectically linked to, and flow from geographic specific understandings of violence? Drawing from the TRC experiences of Greensboro (NC) and Detroit (MI), this paper examines the way communities that were burdened with a history of violence are turning toward TRCs as viable vehicles for addressing violence and inequality in contemporary US society. This paper furthers our understanding of the geographic ruptures violence creates in communities and the often hidden realities that the legacy and memory of violence has for oppressed people in the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-64
Number of pages8
JournalPolitical Geography
Volume52
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science

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