Adolescent Preferences for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing Methods and Impact of Rapid Tests on Receipt of Results

Tanya L. Kowalczyk Mullins, Paula K. Braverman, Lorah D. Dorn, Linda M. Kollar, Jessica A. Kahn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) tests may be more acceptable to adolescents and may improve receipt of test results. We conducted a study to determine (a) adolescent preferences for different HIV testing methods (rapid oral fluid vs. rapid fingerstick vs. traditional venipuncture), (b) factors associated with choice of a rapid vs. traditional test, and (c) whether those who chose a rapid method were more likely to receive test results. Methods: Participants (N = 99, 13-22 years old, both genders) were recruited from an urban hospital-based adolescent primary care clinic, agreed to HIV testing with their choice of method, and completed a questionnaire assessing demographic characteristics and attitudes about HIV testing. Logistic regression modeling was used to determine factors associated with choice of a rapid versus traditional test. Results: Half (50.5%) of participants chose rapid oral fluid testing, 30.3% traditional venipuncture testing, and 19.2% rapid fingerstick testing (p < .01). Factors independently associated with choice of a rapid versus traditional method included preference for an oral fluid versus blood test and perceived approval of HIV testing by one's healthcare provider. Participants who chose a rapid test were more likely to receive their test results within the follow-up period than participants who chose a traditional test (91.3% vs. 46.7%, p < .001). Conclusions: In this study, 70% of adolescents preferred rapid to traditional HIV testing, and rapid testers were more likely to receive their results within the follow-up period. Offering rapid testing may lead to improved receipt of results among adolescents in urban primary care settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-168
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume46
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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