Adolescents' emerging habitus

The role of early parental expectations and practices

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study makes two contributions to the literature. First, it bridges the sociological discussion of social class habitus with psychological notions of adolescents' educational expectations, locus of control, and self-concepts. Second, it empirically examines the relationships between early employed parental practices and expectations and adolescents' dispositions using a recently available wave of data from a nationally representative sample of US students. The findings reveal that students from higher socioeconomic status families had more positive general and area-specific self-concepts, higher educational expectations, higher internal locus of control, and higher academic achievement, and higher parental educational expectations were positively associated with all studied outcomes. The findings provide only partial support for the effects of early parental practices and highlight the role of gender and race/ethnicity in shaping adolescents' habitus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)389-412
Number of pages24
JournalBritish Journal of Sociology of Education
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2014

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adolescent
locus of control
self-concept
academic achievement
disposition
social class
social status
ethnicity
student
gender
literature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Adolescents' emerging habitus : The role of early parental expectations and practices. / Bodovski, Katerina.

In: British Journal of Sociology of Education, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.05.2014, p. 389-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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