Adolescents’ emotional distress and attributions for face-to-face and cyber victimization: Longitudinal linkages to later aggression

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies examined early adolescents’ attributions and emotional distress based on social context (i.e., face-to-face versus cyber), utilizing ambiguous social situations (Study 1; N = 439; 223 girls) and hypothetical unambiguous victimization scenarios (Study 2; N = 414; 212 girls). The relationship of attributions and emotional distress to face-to-face and cyber aggression one year later was also examined. Feelings of sadness and anger as well as hostile, self-blame, and aggressor-blame attributions were more often elicited from face-to-face victimization than cyber victimization. Sadness and anger were linked positively to later face-to-face and cyber aggression. Anger mediated the relationship between attributions (i.e., hostile, aggressor-blame, self-blame) and face-to-face and cyber aggression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume48
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Crime Victims
Anger
Aggression
Emotions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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abstract = "Two studies examined early adolescents’ attributions and emotional distress based on social context (i.e., face-to-face versus cyber), utilizing ambiguous social situations (Study 1; N = 439; 223 girls) and hypothetical unambiguous victimization scenarios (Study 2; N = 414; 212 girls). The relationship of attributions and emotional distress to face-to-face and cyber aggression one year later was also examined. Feelings of sadness and anger as well as hostile, self-blame, and aggressor-blame attributions were more often elicited from face-to-face victimization than cyber victimization. Sadness and anger were linked positively to later face-to-face and cyber aggression. Anger mediated the relationship between attributions (i.e., hostile, aggressor-blame, self-blame) and face-to-face and cyber aggression.",
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