Adults’ Conceptualisations of Children’s Social Competence in Nepal and Malawi

Danming An, Natalie D. Eggum-Wilkens, Sophia Chae, Sarah R. Hayford, Scott Thomas Yabiku, Jennifer Elyse Glick, Linlin Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Adults in Nepal (N = 14) and Malawi (N = 12) were interviewed about their views regarding social competence of 5- to 17-year-old children in their societies. Both Nepali and Malawian adults discussed themes consistent with those expected in collectivistic societies with economic challenges (e.g., respect and obedience, family responsibilities, and social relationships). There were also unique themes emphasised in each country, which may correspond with country-specific religious beliefs or social problems (e.g., rules and self-control, and sexual restraint). Results provide novel information regarding adults’ perceptions of children’s social competence in Nepal and Malawi, and may help guide the development of measures of social competence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-104
Number of pages24
JournalPsychology and Developing Societies
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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Malawi
Nepal
Social Problems
Religion
Economics
Social Skills

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

An, Danming ; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D. ; Chae, Sophia ; Hayford, Sarah R. ; Yabiku, Scott Thomas ; Glick, Jennifer Elyse ; Zhang, Linlin. / Adults’ Conceptualisations of Children’s Social Competence in Nepal and Malawi. In: Psychology and Developing Societies. 2018 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 81-104.
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Adults’ Conceptualisations of Children’s Social Competence in Nepal and Malawi. / An, Danming; Eggum-Wilkens, Natalie D.; Chae, Sophia; Hayford, Sarah R.; Yabiku, Scott Thomas; Glick, Jennifer Elyse; Zhang, Linlin.

In: Psychology and Developing Societies, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.03.2018, p. 81-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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