Adults' Perceptions of Experimental Modifications of Durations of Pauses and Expiratory Sounds in Infant Crying

Philip Sanford Zeskind, Laura Klein, Timothy R. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Durations of all pauses and expiratory sounds in a 10-s bout of infant crying were digitally increased and decreased by 50% to create cries that varied in the duration of pauses and expiratory sounds. Ratings by 40 men and women showed a general monotonic effect of pause duration so that cries with increasingly shorter pauses were perceived to be more arousing, informative, and aversive. The monotonic effect for pause duration was enhanced in an interaction with expiration duration for perceptions of urgency. Results provide the first known experimental evidence of how variations in the temporal structure of infant crying differentially affect adults' perceptions and support views of the cry of the young infant as a graded signal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1162
Number of pages10
JournalDevelopmental psychology
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1992

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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