Advanced wet and dry cleaning coming together for next generation

Marc Heyns, Paul W. Martens, Jerzy Ruzyllo, Maggie Y.M. Lee

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wafer cleaning is the most frequently repeated step in IC manufacturing. Commonly used wet cleaning techniques will remain dominant because of their overall higher cleaning strength. Alternate processes that either reduce or replace chemical usage are being sought because of the current challenges of submicron particle removal, environmental impact from high consumption of water and chemicals, integration into cluster tools, as well as increasing costs. Dry cleaning processes will not replace wet cleans, but will rather complement them and can be used in processes where wet cleans are impractical or inadequate. We will discuss here the latest advances in new wet and dry cleaning techniques and the much needed synergy between them for semiconductor processing in the next millennium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages37-47
Number of pages11
Volume42
No3
Specialist publicationSolid State Technology
StatePublished - Mar 1 1999

Fingerprint

Dry cleaning
cleaning
Cleaning
Environmental impact
Semiconductor materials
Water
complement
Processing
manufacturing
Costs
wafers
costs
water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Heyns, M., Martens, P. W., Ruzyllo, J., & Lee, M. Y. M. (1999). Advanced wet and dry cleaning coming together for next generation. Solid State Technology, 42(3), 37-47.
Heyns, Marc ; Martens, Paul W. ; Ruzyllo, Jerzy ; Lee, Maggie Y.M. / Advanced wet and dry cleaning coming together for next generation. In: Solid State Technology. 1999 ; Vol. 42, No. 3. pp. 37-47.
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Heyns, M, Martens, PW, Ruzyllo, J & Lee, MYM 1999, 'Advanced wet and dry cleaning coming together for next generation' Solid State Technology, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 37-47.

Advanced wet and dry cleaning coming together for next generation. / Heyns, Marc; Martens, Paul W.; Ruzyllo, Jerzy; Lee, Maggie Y.M.

In: Solid State Technology, Vol. 42, No. 3, 01.03.1999, p. 37-47.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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Heyns M, Martens PW, Ruzyllo J, Lee MYM. Advanced wet and dry cleaning coming together for next generation. Solid State Technology. 1999 Mar 1;42(3):37-47.