Aerial predation and butterfly design: how palatability, mimicry, and the need for evasive flight constrain mass allocation

J. H. Marden, Chai Peng Chai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

113 Scopus citations

Abstract

Among 124 Neotropical species, allocation of body mass to flight muscle and other tissues varied according to palatability and mimicry status. Unpalatable and mimetic species had proportionally less flight muscle and had larger guts and ovaries, which may allow greater fecundity. Nearly all palatable and nonmimetic species had enough flight muscle to enable greater acceleration than avian insectivores, but at the cost of having smaller guts and ovaries. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-36
Number of pages22
JournalAmerican Naturalist
Volume138
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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