Affordable greenhouses: A tool to increase farmers' adaptive capacity to climate change

Megan A. Biek, Wanchen Chung, Khanjan Mehta

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The African continent is most vulnerable to climate change due to a multitude of environmental stressors and low adaptive capacity. Climate change stresses agriculture via rising temperatures and changing precipitation patterns, as well as increased soil vulnerability, climate variability, pests and crop disease, and increased atmospheric carbon dioxide. Affordable greenhouse solutions work on a small, sustainable scale to mitigate some of the effects of climate change and provide strategies for smallholder farmers to adapt to the changing environment. Greenhouses cannot reverse climate change, but they are well suited to increase the adaptive capacity of the agricultural sector in developing nations. This article examines affordable greenhouses and the role they play in mitigating the effects of climate change for small-scale farmers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages321-325
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781467365611
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 2015
Event5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015 - Seattle, United States
Duration: Oct 8 2015Oct 11 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the 5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015

Other

Other5th IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference, GHTC 2015
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period10/8/1510/11/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Development
  • Education

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