Age and food preferences influence dietary intakes of breast care patients

Adam Drewnowski, Susan Ahlstrom Henderson, Clayton S. Hann, Anne Barratt-Fornell, Mack Ruffin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Identifying major influences on food choice is an important component of nutrition intervention research. Sensitivity to the bitter taste of 6-n- propylthiouracil (PROP) and self-reported preferences for meats, fats, vegetables, and fruit were examined in 329 female breast care patients. Intakes of fat, saturated fat, fiber, folate, and vitamin C, established using 4-day food diaries, were the chief health outcome variables. The strongest predictor of food preferences was age. Preferences were linked to food intakes. Older women consumed less energy and saturated fat and more dietary fiber and vitamin C than did younger women. Age-related decline in taste sensitivity to PROP was associated with increased liking for bitter cruciferous vegetables. Age-associated changes in food preferences and eating habits have implications for the dietary approach to cancer prevention and control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)570-578
Number of pages9
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999

Fingerprint

Food Preferences
Patient Care
Breast
Fats
Propylthiouracil
Feeding Behavior
Vegetables
Ascorbic Acid
Diet Records
Dietary Fiber
Folic Acid
Meat
Fruit
Eating
Food
Health
Research
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Drewnowski, Adam ; Henderson, Susan Ahlstrom ; Hann, Clayton S. ; Barratt-Fornell, Anne ; Ruffin, Mack. / Age and food preferences influence dietary intakes of breast care patients. In: Health Psychology. 1999 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 570-578.
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Drewnowski, A, Henderson, SA, Hann, CS, Barratt-Fornell, A & Ruffin, M 1999, 'Age and food preferences influence dietary intakes of breast care patients', Health Psychology, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 570-578. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.18.6.570

Age and food preferences influence dietary intakes of breast care patients. / Drewnowski, Adam; Henderson, Susan Ahlstrom; Hann, Clayton S.; Barratt-Fornell, Anne; Ruffin, Mack.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 18, No. 6, 01.11.1999, p. 570-578.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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