Age-related differences in the pancreatic β-cell response to hyperglycemia after eccentric exercise

Raj K. Krishnan, Jazmir M. Hernandez, David L. Williamson, IV, Donal J. O'Gorman, William J. Evans, John P. Kirwan

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24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eccentric exercise (ECC) causes muscle damage, insulin resistance, and increased pancreatic β-cell secretion in young individuals. However, the effects of age on the pancreatic β-cell response to glucose after ECC are unknown. Hyperglycemic clamps (180 min, 10.0 mM) were performed on eight young (age 22 ± 1 yr) and eight older (age 66 ± 2 yr) healthy sedentary males without exercise (CONT) and 48 h after ECC. ECC increased (P < 0.02) muscle soreness ratings and plasma creatine kinase concentrations in both groups. Insulin and C-peptide secretions were similar between young and older subjects during CONT clamps. ECC increased (P < 0.05) first-phase (0-10 min) C-peptide area under the curve in young (4.2 ± 0.4 vs. 317 ± 0.6 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT, respectively) but not in Older subjects (3.2 ± 0.7 vs. 3.5 ± 0.7 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT), with significant group differences (P < 0.02). Indeed, ECC repressed (P < 0.05) first-phase peak C-peptide concentrations in older subjects (0.93 ± 0.16 vs. 1.12 ± 0.11 nM; ECC vs. CONT). Moreover, first-phase C-peptide-to-insulin molar ratios suggest age-related differences (P < 0.05) in insulin/C-peptide clearance after ECC. Furthermore, the observed C-peptide response after ECC was related to abdominal adiposity [r = -0.62, P < 0.02, and r = -0.66, P < 0.006, for first and second (10-180 min) phases, respectively]. In conclusion, older individuals did not exhibit the compensatory increase in β-cell secretion observed among young individuals after ECC. Thus, with increasing age, the pancreatic β-cell may be less responsive to the physiological stress associated with ECC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume275
Issue number3 38-3
StatePublished - Sep 1 1998

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C-Peptide
Hyperglycemia
Insulin
Clamping devices
Muscle
Physiological Stress
Myalgia
Adiposity
Creatine Kinase
Area Under Curve
Insulin Resistance
Plasmas
Glucose
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Krishnan, Raj K. ; Hernandez, Jazmir M. ; Williamson, IV, David L. ; O'Gorman, Donal J. ; Evans, William J. ; Kirwan, John P. / Age-related differences in the pancreatic β-cell response to hyperglycemia after eccentric exercise. In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1998 ; Vol. 275, No. 3 38-3.
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title = "Age-related differences in the pancreatic β-cell response to hyperglycemia after eccentric exercise",
abstract = "Eccentric exercise (ECC) causes muscle damage, insulin resistance, and increased pancreatic β-cell secretion in young individuals. However, the effects of age on the pancreatic β-cell response to glucose after ECC are unknown. Hyperglycemic clamps (180 min, 10.0 mM) were performed on eight young (age 22 ± 1 yr) and eight older (age 66 ± 2 yr) healthy sedentary males without exercise (CONT) and 48 h after ECC. ECC increased (P < 0.02) muscle soreness ratings and plasma creatine kinase concentrations in both groups. Insulin and C-peptide secretions were similar between young and older subjects during CONT clamps. ECC increased (P < 0.05) first-phase (0-10 min) C-peptide area under the curve in young (4.2 ± 0.4 vs. 317 ± 0.6 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT, respectively) but not in Older subjects (3.2 ± 0.7 vs. 3.5 ± 0.7 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT), with significant group differences (P < 0.02). Indeed, ECC repressed (P < 0.05) first-phase peak C-peptide concentrations in older subjects (0.93 ± 0.16 vs. 1.12 ± 0.11 nM; ECC vs. CONT). Moreover, first-phase C-peptide-to-insulin molar ratios suggest age-related differences (P < 0.05) in insulin/C-peptide clearance after ECC. Furthermore, the observed C-peptide response after ECC was related to abdominal adiposity [r = -0.62, P < 0.02, and r = -0.66, P < 0.006, for first and second (10-180 min) phases, respectively]. In conclusion, older individuals did not exhibit the compensatory increase in β-cell secretion observed among young individuals after ECC. Thus, with increasing age, the pancreatic β-cell may be less responsive to the physiological stress associated with ECC.",
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Age-related differences in the pancreatic β-cell response to hyperglycemia after eccentric exercise. / Krishnan, Raj K.; Hernandez, Jazmir M.; Williamson, IV, David L.; O'Gorman, Donal J.; Evans, William J.; Kirwan, John P.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 275, No. 3 38-3, 01.09.1998.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Age-related differences in the pancreatic β-cell response to hyperglycemia after eccentric exercise

AU - Krishnan, Raj K.

AU - Hernandez, Jazmir M.

AU - Williamson, IV, David L.

AU - O'Gorman, Donal J.

AU - Evans, William J.

AU - Kirwan, John P.

PY - 1998/9/1

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N2 - Eccentric exercise (ECC) causes muscle damage, insulin resistance, and increased pancreatic β-cell secretion in young individuals. However, the effects of age on the pancreatic β-cell response to glucose after ECC are unknown. Hyperglycemic clamps (180 min, 10.0 mM) were performed on eight young (age 22 ± 1 yr) and eight older (age 66 ± 2 yr) healthy sedentary males without exercise (CONT) and 48 h after ECC. ECC increased (P < 0.02) muscle soreness ratings and plasma creatine kinase concentrations in both groups. Insulin and C-peptide secretions were similar between young and older subjects during CONT clamps. ECC increased (P < 0.05) first-phase (0-10 min) C-peptide area under the curve in young (4.2 ± 0.4 vs. 317 ± 0.6 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT, respectively) but not in Older subjects (3.2 ± 0.7 vs. 3.5 ± 0.7 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT), with significant group differences (P < 0.02). Indeed, ECC repressed (P < 0.05) first-phase peak C-peptide concentrations in older subjects (0.93 ± 0.16 vs. 1.12 ± 0.11 nM; ECC vs. CONT). Moreover, first-phase C-peptide-to-insulin molar ratios suggest age-related differences (P < 0.05) in insulin/C-peptide clearance after ECC. Furthermore, the observed C-peptide response after ECC was related to abdominal adiposity [r = -0.62, P < 0.02, and r = -0.66, P < 0.006, for first and second (10-180 min) phases, respectively]. In conclusion, older individuals did not exhibit the compensatory increase in β-cell secretion observed among young individuals after ECC. Thus, with increasing age, the pancreatic β-cell may be less responsive to the physiological stress associated with ECC.

AB - Eccentric exercise (ECC) causes muscle damage, insulin resistance, and increased pancreatic β-cell secretion in young individuals. However, the effects of age on the pancreatic β-cell response to glucose after ECC are unknown. Hyperglycemic clamps (180 min, 10.0 mM) were performed on eight young (age 22 ± 1 yr) and eight older (age 66 ± 2 yr) healthy sedentary males without exercise (CONT) and 48 h after ECC. ECC increased (P < 0.02) muscle soreness ratings and plasma creatine kinase concentrations in both groups. Insulin and C-peptide secretions were similar between young and older subjects during CONT clamps. ECC increased (P < 0.05) first-phase (0-10 min) C-peptide area under the curve in young (4.2 ± 0.4 vs. 317 ± 0.6 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT, respectively) but not in Older subjects (3.2 ± 0.7 vs. 3.5 ± 0.7 nM · min; ECC vs. CONT), with significant group differences (P < 0.02). Indeed, ECC repressed (P < 0.05) first-phase peak C-peptide concentrations in older subjects (0.93 ± 0.16 vs. 1.12 ± 0.11 nM; ECC vs. CONT). Moreover, first-phase C-peptide-to-insulin molar ratios suggest age-related differences (P < 0.05) in insulin/C-peptide clearance after ECC. Furthermore, the observed C-peptide response after ECC was related to abdominal adiposity [r = -0.62, P < 0.02, and r = -0.66, P < 0.006, for first and second (10-180 min) phases, respectively]. In conclusion, older individuals did not exhibit the compensatory increase in β-cell secretion observed among young individuals after ECC. Thus, with increasing age, the pancreatic β-cell may be less responsive to the physiological stress associated with ECC.

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