Agency characteristics and changes in home health quality after home health compare

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examines the association between home health agency characteristics and quality improvement in home health care after Home Health Compare (HHC), a public-reporting initiative in the Medicare program. Method: We examined the changes in seven quality measures reported in HHC from 2003 to 2007. We used a linear regression model to examine whether quality changes over time differed by agency characteristics. Results: We found improvements in quality after HHC in the indicators that measure patients ability to independently manage daily activities; however, the use of emergent care did not change, and hospitalization rates increased during the study period. Agencies with low quality at baseline, not-for-profit or hospital-based agencies, and agencies with longer Medicare tenure showed greater improvement for some quality measures than their counterparts. Discussion: There was large variation in the degree of quality improvement after HHC by quality indicators and by agency characteristics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)454-476
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

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Quality Improvement
Health
Medicare
health
Linear Models
Home Care Agencies
Home Care Services
Hospitalization
Delivery of Health Care
hospitalization
profit
health care
regression
ability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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Agency characteristics and changes in home health quality after home health compare. / Jung, Kyoungrae; Shea, Dennis; Warner, Candy.

In: Journal of Aging and Health, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.06.2010, p. 454-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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