Aging, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s disease

What do refugees from the former Soviet Union think?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Since the mid-1970s, approximately 700,000 émigrés from the former Soviet Union (FSU), most of Jewish descent, settled in the United States. Now, 25 or more years post-emigration, they have “aged in place” in the United States, but their values, beliefs, and attitudes about growing old, memory changes, and Alzheimer’s disease remain grounded in their earlier life experiences. Based on findings from a study of the social and cultural factors affecting beliefs about Alzheimer’s disease, aging, and memory loss, this article examines how past life experiences, the immigration experience, and cultural values affect Russian-speaking refugees’ beliefs and views about aging, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-146
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging
Volume29
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2017

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dementia
USSR
refugee
experience
emigration
cultural factors
social factors
speaking
Values
immigration
Refugees
Alzheimer's Disease
Soviet Union

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Religious studies
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

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title = "Aging, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s disease: What do refugees from the former Soviet Union think?",
abstract = "Since the mid-1970s, approximately 700,000 {\'e}migr{\'e}s from the former Soviet Union (FSU), most of Jewish descent, settled in the United States. Now, 25 or more years post-emigration, they have “aged in place” in the United States, but their values, beliefs, and attitudes about growing old, memory changes, and Alzheimer’s disease remain grounded in their earlier life experiences. Based on findings from a study of the social and cultural factors affecting beliefs about Alzheimer’s disease, aging, and memory loss, this article examines how past life experiences, the immigration experience, and cultural values affect Russian-speaking refugees’ beliefs and views about aging, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s disease.",
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Aging, memory loss, and Alzheimer’s disease : What do refugees from the former Soviet Union think? / Iris, Madelyn; Schrauf, Robert William.

In: Journal of Religion, Spirituality and Aging, Vol. 29, No. 2-3, 03.07.2017, p. 130-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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