Air pollution associated hypertension and increased blood pressure may be reduced by breastfeeding in Chinese children

The Seven Northeastern Cities Chinese Children's Study

Guang Hui Dong, Zhengmin Qian, Edwin Trevathan, Xiao Wen Zeng, Michael G. Vaughn, Jing Wang, Yang Zhao, Yu Qin Liu, Wan Hui Ren, Xiao Di Qin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Methods Nine thousand three hundred fifty-four Chinese children, ages 5-17 years old, from 24 elementary schools and 24 middle schools in the Seven Northeastern Cities during 2012-2013 were evaluated. The weight, height, and BP were measured. Four-year average concentrations of particles with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), ozone (O3), and carbon monoxide (CO) were calculated from monitoring stations. Two-level regression analysis was used to examine the effects, controlling for covariates.

Results The results showed that associations existed between hypertension and pollutants. The odds ratios for hypertension ranged from 1.12 per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.13) to 1.68 per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95% CI, 1.53-1.86). The increases in mean diastolic BP ranged from 0.58 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% CI, 0.52-0.63 mm Hg) to 2.89 mm Hg per 563.4 μg/m3 increase for CO (95% CI: 2.53-3.24 mm Hg). The increase in systolic BP ranged from 0.50 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% CI: 0.43-0.57 mm Hg) to 2.10 mm Hg per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95% CI, 1.73-2.47 mm Hg). Compared with children who had been breastfed, non-breastfed children exhibited consistently stronger effects. Conclusion Study findings indicate that high levels of PM10, SO2, NO2, O3, and CO are associated with increased arterial BP and hypertension among the children. Breastfeeding may reduce the risk.

Background Little is known about the association between air pollution and hypertension among children, and no studies report whether breastfeeding modifies this association in children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)956-961
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume176
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2014

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Air Pollution
Breast Feeding
Confidence Intervals
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Carbon Monoxide
Nitrogen Dioxide
Sulfur Dioxide
Ozone
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Dong, Guang Hui ; Qian, Zhengmin ; Trevathan, Edwin ; Zeng, Xiao Wen ; Vaughn, Michael G. ; Wang, Jing ; Zhao, Yang ; Liu, Yu Qin ; Ren, Wan Hui ; Qin, Xiao Di. / Air pollution associated hypertension and increased blood pressure may be reduced by breastfeeding in Chinese children : The Seven Northeastern Cities Chinese Children's Study. In: International Journal of Cardiology. 2014 ; Vol. 176, No. 3. pp. 956-961.
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title = "Air pollution associated hypertension and increased blood pressure may be reduced by breastfeeding in Chinese children: The Seven Northeastern Cities Chinese Children's Study",
abstract = "Methods Nine thousand three hundred fifty-four Chinese children, ages 5-17 years old, from 24 elementary schools and 24 middle schools in the Seven Northeastern Cities during 2012-2013 were evaluated. The weight, height, and BP were measured. Four-year average concentrations of particles with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), ozone (O3), and carbon monoxide (CO) were calculated from monitoring stations. Two-level regression analysis was used to examine the effects, controlling for covariates.Results The results showed that associations existed between hypertension and pollutants. The odds ratios for hypertension ranged from 1.12 per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.13) to 1.68 per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95{\%} CI, 1.53-1.86). The increases in mean diastolic BP ranged from 0.58 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95{\%} CI, 0.52-0.63 mm Hg) to 2.89 mm Hg per 563.4 μg/m3 increase for CO (95{\%} CI: 2.53-3.24 mm Hg). The increase in systolic BP ranged from 0.50 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95{\%} CI: 0.43-0.57 mm Hg) to 2.10 mm Hg per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95{\%} CI, 1.73-2.47 mm Hg). Compared with children who had been breastfed, non-breastfed children exhibited consistently stronger effects. Conclusion Study findings indicate that high levels of PM10, SO2, NO2, O3, and CO are associated with increased arterial BP and hypertension among the children. Breastfeeding may reduce the risk.Background Little is known about the association between air pollution and hypertension among children, and no studies report whether breastfeeding modifies this association in children.",
author = "Dong, {Guang Hui} and Zhengmin Qian and Edwin Trevathan and Zeng, {Xiao Wen} and Vaughn, {Michael G.} and Jing Wang and Yang Zhao and Liu, {Yu Qin} and Ren, {Wan Hui} and Qin, {Xiao Di}",
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Air pollution associated hypertension and increased blood pressure may be reduced by breastfeeding in Chinese children : The Seven Northeastern Cities Chinese Children's Study. / Dong, Guang Hui; Qian, Zhengmin; Trevathan, Edwin; Zeng, Xiao Wen; Vaughn, Michael G.; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Yu Qin; Ren, Wan Hui; Qin, Xiao Di.

In: International Journal of Cardiology, Vol. 176, No. 3, 20.10.2014, p. 956-961.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Air pollution associated hypertension and increased blood pressure may be reduced by breastfeeding in Chinese children

T2 - The Seven Northeastern Cities Chinese Children's Study

AU - Dong, Guang Hui

AU - Qian, Zhengmin

AU - Trevathan, Edwin

AU - Zeng, Xiao Wen

AU - Vaughn, Michael G.

AU - Wang, Jing

AU - Zhao, Yang

AU - Liu, Yu Qin

AU - Ren, Wan Hui

AU - Qin, Xiao Di

PY - 2014/10/20

Y1 - 2014/10/20

N2 - Methods Nine thousand three hundred fifty-four Chinese children, ages 5-17 years old, from 24 elementary schools and 24 middle schools in the Seven Northeastern Cities during 2012-2013 were evaluated. The weight, height, and BP were measured. Four-year average concentrations of particles with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), ozone (O3), and carbon monoxide (CO) were calculated from monitoring stations. Two-level regression analysis was used to examine the effects, controlling for covariates.Results The results showed that associations existed between hypertension and pollutants. The odds ratios for hypertension ranged from 1.12 per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.13) to 1.68 per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95% CI, 1.53-1.86). The increases in mean diastolic BP ranged from 0.58 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% CI, 0.52-0.63 mm Hg) to 2.89 mm Hg per 563.4 μg/m3 increase for CO (95% CI: 2.53-3.24 mm Hg). The increase in systolic BP ranged from 0.50 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% CI: 0.43-0.57 mm Hg) to 2.10 mm Hg per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95% CI, 1.73-2.47 mm Hg). Compared with children who had been breastfed, non-breastfed children exhibited consistently stronger effects. Conclusion Study findings indicate that high levels of PM10, SO2, NO2, O3, and CO are associated with increased arterial BP and hypertension among the children. Breastfeeding may reduce the risk.Background Little is known about the association between air pollution and hypertension among children, and no studies report whether breastfeeding modifies this association in children.

AB - Methods Nine thousand three hundred fifty-four Chinese children, ages 5-17 years old, from 24 elementary schools and 24 middle schools in the Seven Northeastern Cities during 2012-2013 were evaluated. The weight, height, and BP were measured. Four-year average concentrations of particles with an aerodynamic diameter of ≤10 μm (PM10), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxides (NO2), ozone (O3), and carbon monoxide (CO) were calculated from monitoring stations. Two-level regression analysis was used to examine the effects, controlling for covariates.Results The results showed that associations existed between hypertension and pollutants. The odds ratios for hypertension ranged from 1.12 per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.13) to 1.68 per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95% CI, 1.53-1.86). The increases in mean diastolic BP ranged from 0.58 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% CI, 0.52-0.63 mm Hg) to 2.89 mm Hg per 563.4 μg/m3 increase for CO (95% CI: 2.53-3.24 mm Hg). The increase in systolic BP ranged from 0.50 mm Hg per 46.3 μg/m3 increase for O2 (95% CI: 0.43-0.57 mm Hg) to 2.10 mm Hg per 30.6 μg/m3 increase for PM10 (95% CI, 1.73-2.47 mm Hg). Compared with children who had been breastfed, non-breastfed children exhibited consistently stronger effects. Conclusion Study findings indicate that high levels of PM10, SO2, NO2, O3, and CO are associated with increased arterial BP and hypertension among the children. Breastfeeding may reduce the risk.Background Little is known about the association between air pollution and hypertension among children, and no studies report whether breastfeeding modifies this association in children.

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